/retro/ - Y2K

1990s and 2000s Nostalgia

SAVE THIS FILE: Anon.cafe Fallback File v1.0 (updated 2021-01-10)

Want your event posted here? Requests accepted in this /meta/ thread.

Max message length: 5120

Drag files to upload or
click here to select them

Maximum 5 files / Maximum size: 20.00 MB

Captcha
no cookies?
Board Rules
More

(used to delete files and postings)


Web 1.0 and Web 1.5 Nostalgia General Fellow Time Traveler 09/09/2019 (Mon) 01:52:13 No.24
So, what are some of your favorite memories of the old internet? Can be websites, memes, events or any other aspect of the days of Web 1.0 and 1.5 For a quick reference, here's what I would define as Web 1.0 and Web 1.5 >Web 1.0: Usenet, Geocities and Angelfire, AOL (1991-2001) >Web 1.5: Early YouTube, ED, 4chan in its "wild west" days, MySpace, YTMND, Newgrounds and the peak years of dA and Fanfiction.net (2001-2008) You also had cross-generation stuff like GameFAQs and IMDB which are still around today, although sadly IMDB's infamous message boards are gone
I love digging around on geocities.ws and looking at all of the neat old pages that people used to own. Decentralized web looked very comfy.
>>26
>Decentralized web looked very comfy.
Technically Geocities was a centralized free webhost, but I get what you were trying to get through. Personalized websites were more fun than stale social media profiles.
I remember all the sites, pages, etc. dedicated to just bashing things.

>the "Internet Explorer is evil" section of Toastytech
>a site called Commercials I Hate, whose forum is surprisingly still active although the original articles are gone
>AVGN and all the knockoffs
>711chan's /RAGE/
>every personal website with a "things that PISS ME OFF!!!1" page
>>28
I also miss the days when you could be genuinely angry and hate something on the internet without blind shills defending it, people saying that 'hate' needed to be removed, and worst of all the general shitter who hates everything, but the site most of all which is why he just dumps on everything and derails discussion.
>>29
Agreed
>>34
>>35
>>36
>>37
>>38
>>39
>>40

I don't know why, but there's just something about the old web pages of the 90's and early 2000's that is charming.

Yeah, they tend to be tacky and gaudy as fuck, but in all honesty I think that's a major part of the charm.

Also, does anyone remember this old site? IIRC, it started in 1999 and was run by some old-school otaku chick named Rowena Lim Lei for many years until she became a mom and handed it over to a new guy.

I used to love their hentai reviews and I'm gonna go into further detail about it in the /retro34/ thread. Pic related.

http://www.animetric.com/index.php
>>41
>I don't know why, but there's just something about the old web pages of the 90's and early 2000's that is charming.
It's because each one was designed by some person as a labor of love. These days every website looks the same.
>>42
This.
I was digging around on some angelfire pages and found the page of a gothic girl whose husband passed away. Reading through the love poems and stories she made for him made me really sad, and things like this continue to make me wonder how the owners of these old webpages are today. Does anyone else wonder that? If the owner of a geocities page from 1999 is doing well in life at this current moment? Even if I've never met them, I always get curious.
>>50
I often wonder this myself. Hell, I'm still wondering this about an entire group of people. They were called Disaster Labs. Most people know them as being "the guys who did Arfenhouse", but I liked reading some of their work long before I knew what AH even was. The only one I can find who's still around is this guy who was the biggest furry in the group (so much that he always used a voice changer when speaking, to match his fursona). Everyone else, I can't find any recent trace of. Misteroo, the main guy behind Arfenhouse, is even presumed dead by some people.

I imagine that most old users, if they're still around and haven't taken to social media, are chilling out in an IRC channel or on a private forum somewhere with the rest of their longtime buddies. Though it makes me wonder why the creative ones have stopped putting out new creations. Maybe they feel they've outgrown it, maybe they got a job that leaves them with too little free time, I'm not sure.
http://theoldnet.com/
>Welcome To The Old Internet Again!
>The Old Internet Again is an attempt to restore vintage web browsing on vintage computers.
>It uses the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine API and a proxy that strips out any incompatible javascript and stitches together as many links as it can.
>>77
Neat, thanks anon.
>>77
>tfw the web itself is literally a Wizard now
>>77
This and https://wiby.me/ are both wonderful websites. Thanks for the site Time Traveler.
>>77
>site is blocked by malwarebytes
shame
>>77
>Malwarebytes blocked it because phishing
I was just thinking, you don't see many sites these days with easter eggs hidden in the page source.

>>100
>>101
https://forums.malwarebytes.com/topic/250160-need-theoldnetcom-removed-due-to-false-positive/
It's a false positive, the nature of how it works is similar to how phishing sites work I guess. The owner says even paypal flagged it because it was serving up "fake" (aka old and archived) versions of paypal.
>>102
It's still doing that shit for some weird reason.
>>41
the site you linked is really cool.
The sad thing is that search engines, especially google, are excluding these small sites from searches. Already theese sites don't have the same health they used to have, but in the last years search engines have practically excluded them from the internet, giving space to big media and social media, with subpar content.
>>104
That's a shame. I love these smaller sites.
http://www.geocities.ws/Nashville/2334/index-2.html
I love these neat little pages made by college or high school kids. Sometimes the neat little images that decorate the pages are nice.
>>28
711chan I will miss the most out of everything.
>>29
This is what made the early internet so unbelievably based: it was just private individuals hosting their webpages. It's a lot harder to censor people when their point of weakness is their local ISP. Admittedly these days the censorship has gotten so bad they will shut down your fucking bank account, but a few years it wasn't at that point, and I often pined for the old days when people's opinions were safe because it was hosted on their own server.
>>24
Definitely Internet 1.0. I remember putting various games up for my friends on my personal ISP directory, anyone could go and download them. Had a webring, but in retrospect a lot of that shit was cringey as fuck. As far as services, screenshots of vanilla ICQ still gives me that warm nostalgia glow.
>>132
Not even "early", it was like that until 2007
http://jsf3.homestead.com/ Came across this gem. Logo fanatics existed even in Web 1.0.
>>133
I just love that screenshot. It gives me many emotions.
>>104
In my experience bing is much better at finding old websites.
>>138
Holy shit that domain threw me back. I'd completely forgotten about Homestead and I'm pretty sure I had a site there.

I can't remember a logo ever freaking me out like that or impacting me much at all. I guess the closest was "The incredible world of DiC" always being funny to a kid. What even is a logo fanatic? I feel like there's a world of autism you're referring to.
As probably everyone here I miss old personal websites, blogs and webrings. Internet felt more authentic and adventurous, now everything is the same dull minimalist predictable corporatecuck shit.

Another thing I really miss is old browser games, they were great quality; had quite few levels, etc. Now they're super simple and lame. Many old great games can no longer be played (outdated shockwave) and soon with the complete death of flash none of them will no longer work.


>>77
>>84
Thanks for the sites anons!
>>171
>Gorrilaz Final Drive
fuck that takes me back.
Did anyone else play Need For Madness back in the day?
>>131
what happened to 99chan.org? It was still going for ages but seems to be gone now
https://web.archive.org/web/20010405072719/http://www.classicgaming.com:80/pac-man/home.html
I used to download Pac-Man clones from here and play them on my dad's old PC around 06-07. Good times.
>>134
>2007
>>204
not quite an old site per se, but it has a bit of the feel https://motherfuckingwebsite.com/
>>172
I might have, but it's not that memorable for me...
If you're interested, I found link to download it http://needformadness.com/
I also found one for the old Gorrilaz game https://archive.org/details/Gorillaz192000Game and it's with the music! If you try to play on web, they don't have it.
Man, it really feels like the 2000's when you play Final Drive.
My brother got me hooked on Counter-Strike back in 2004 when I was twelve. He got me my own Steam account by trading something of his for a friend's CD key of Half-Life Platinum Edition. Once I found out about custom maps and modding, I absolutely had to get into it, so I had my brother set up Hammer Editor 3.4 and ZHLT compile tools with Nem's Batch Compiler. I think some of my happiest days were spent figuring it all out with resources from the Valve Editor Reference Collective. I wish I could go back.
https://web.archive.org/web/20040524034647/http://collective.valve-erc.com/
Playing around with an old version of Google Desktop, and man, this old Google layout really brings back some memories.
>>171 >Trick or Treat Beat The studio that made the game (Saucer Media) re-released it several years ago as a standalone EXE file. So if you have Windows you can just run that. It's no longer on their website though so I uploaded it here: https://u.teknik.io/9sJso.zip This game gave me hope that there's a way to repackage old Shockwave games into standalone EXEs, perhaps using old versions of Macromedia SW.
>>138 at the bottom of that site's page there's a link to another site at http://timvp.com/index.html this guy is a 60 year old boomer who has taken photos and videos of himself on his 67 travels around the world. he lives in a huge house with a huge lawn and he can somehow afford all this from his job of co-owning a KFC restaurant, which he retired from 3 years ago. the site has been up since 2000 and the last update was 2 months ago. i don't know who he thinks the audience is for his website, but he reveals a lot of information about himself. so much that you could easily piece together where he lives if you wanted to. what a wild guy.
REMINDER There's still a site called eBaum's World Dot Com https://www.ebaumsworld.com/
>>246 Neat Thanks anon! >This game gave me hope that there's a way to repackage old Shockwave games into standalone EXEs, perhaps using old versions of Macromedia SW I think SWF can be converted to EXE, as far as I know. It would be great if it will be done to more games. Speaking of old browser flash games there's a huge project to reserve them >>>/f/448
>>251 Anytime anon. SWF files can indeed be converted to EXEs and quite easily too, I can write a guide for that if anyone's interested... But SWF files are Flash and not Shockwave like Trick or Treat Beat. Shockwave files (DCR) are the hardest to run because the format wasn't as popular as Flash, and for that you won't find much support for them online. >Speaking of old browser flash games there's a huge project to reserve them >>>/f/448 Didn't know about that, great to see other people interested in preserving flash games. I did some archiving myself a few years ago when I heard adobe was ending support for flash, I revisited newgrounds and other similar websites to salvage my favorite games and animations... I discovered that some of the animations were replaced with regular streamable videos, but thankfully the original SWFs were still available on a website called SWFchan ( http://swfchan.com ) which had plenty of old flash files archived.
>>250 >Low tax is a broken wreck who despises everything SA has become but can't shut it down or the house of cards will collapse and he will lose his home >m00t grew to hate his community so much he insulted them and betrayed them as much as possible before selling them out to the pigfarmer's old grifting buddy and moved on to work at jewgle >YTMND collapsed, not in a explosion, but into a puddle of apathy and irrelevance Guess eBaum won in the end
>>249 >asian wife >never smiles in ANY of his photos i think it's safe to say this guy is one of us.
>>255 >that song >its creator is now a cookie-cutter media dickrider who whines about the usual boogeymen Same goes with everyone else who's been around as long as he has. You'd think that with all the time they've spent online, they'd have learned to think for themselves every once in a while, but it's just not the case.
>>34 Holy shit, that kid in the picture must be either 19 or 20 years old now
>>138 That's weird. I just assumed the "scary logo" thing started with autistic Millennials. >>249 I like that house of house.
>>246 Talking about Cartoon Network. What about Cartoon Orbit and the cToons game? That was great
Remember when Cartoon Network tried to monetize flash games? >>300 cToons was a pretty cool concept but the execution wasn't great. I remember Jawbreakers being the win button. This isn't /retro/ but I remember there being a game on the CN website that reused the cToons engine. It was singleplayer only and you could only use a preconstructed deck, though. I think it was under a different name but I distinctly remember it being a Transformers game if you want to hunt it down.
My primary memories of the old internet are wrestling based, like a lot of people I got hugely into it in the late 90's (in fact I only recently stopped watching altogether). It was kind of the perfect hobby for the internet and I spent a lot of my teenage years reading rumours, downloading shitty MIDI files of wrestling themes (or, if you were really lucky, a WAV file taken directly from a TV show with the commentary edited out), writing and reading reviews of old shows (A lot of people tried doing this, mostly just copying the style and opinions of a guy named Scott Keith despite the fact that everyone claimed they hated him), participating in E-Feds run by highschoolers and of course posting on wrestling message boards. I liked Delphi Forums best and surprisingly the site - and some of the boards - still exist, though they're long dead. Having my childhood conversations still online is kind of nice, even if it is a bit (well, extremely) cringy to read them now. Every so often I check to see if any of the other regulars have come back but it's only ever happened once, though I do still keep in contact with one guy I met back then. If anyone is interested, a couple of big sites from then are still hosted more-or-less as they were: http://ddtdigest.com/ http://slashwrestling.com/ Anyway, sorry for the spergy blog post about something most of you won't give a shit about, though to be fair spergy blog posts about things most people didn't give a shit about were also a big part of the 90's internet...
>>28 Did somebody say everything pisses me off pages? http://viper.shadowflareindustries.com/antigsc/index.php?rants=
>>331 >Everything here is copryight my ass. That's right, my ass 0wnz j00! I think that took me back more than anything else did zOMG hai2u L0L j00 r teh fux0rz 4 redin d1s!!!!!!1111!!111one11.
I remember this 2000's humor website with some neat gimmicky experiment sites. I'm pretty sure there were more websites of this kind back then full of interesting flash and shockwave stuff http://www.project-euh.com/
>>132 How could we get people to make their own websites again? I know for sure the reason why social media rose up is that making an account on Twitter is far easier, cheaper and less tech knowledge intensive than buying a domain, paying for hosting or hosting the site yourself, and coding the page, but with all the censorship and dumb shit going on with social media in terms of privacy and free speech, self hosted personal websites could perhaps become an option for some people. With stuff like Neocities and GitHub Pages we're also seeing small classic personal sites made just for fun
>>364 The appeal of social media isn't just ease of setting up. There's also the sharing aspect. You make a post, people can hit retweet/reblog/rewhatever to share it, and as it spreads around you'll gather internet points in the form of likes, notes, karma, etc. Which is addictive to these people. Plus, people don't really care for freedom of speech, thanks to all the psyops altering the public perception of that term to mean muh notsees. Github Pages is meant mainly for devs to host sites for their software, give users an easy download link and news and all that. Neocities would be a good start, too bad Sophialicemily is the only kind of person who cares about making a site there. Though I imagine it shouldn't be too hard to encourage not-trannies to start using it.
>>364 People don't even have to "code the page" anymore, thanks to programs like Kompozer that create web pages graphically (WYSIWYG). It's literally no different than creating a styled word document... That being said, I would rather personal websites remain a niche. I don't want normals and socjus faggots taking over Neocities or similar services, let them stay in their containment spaces instead of spreading their cancer everywhere. Creative people who don't want to use cancerous social media will naturally start making their own personal websites, or at least gravitate towards imageboards. In any case, leading by example is the best way to advertise personal websites. Make one and if it's good your visitors will want to make something like it. This is how to spread the idea. >>365 >Sophialicemily What's that?
>>366 Sophia, Alice, Emily, three names that are very common among internet trannies. Especially the ones into compsci.
I found a decent Stumbleupon/randomwebsitegenerator revival that doesn't take you to boring journo/business shit. It supports submissions and it's moderated, but it doesn't allow NSFW sites. Take it or leave it https://stumblingon.com/ I also found a directory of old sites there: https://peelopaalu.neocities.org/
>>395 >peelopaalu This is some good shit, helped me find a crack to an old obscure program I had.
do any of you have Web sites? Would you mind if I share my Neocities site? (inb4 shill) floppys-lounge.neocities.org
>>404 (not found) I like your website, looks comfy and you have some nice links on there. Anons sharing their neocities here would be a good idea in my opinion, that's more traffic for the board and more content to share between anons.
>>410 thanks man back on 8ch I met some people with their own sites too, mine is more just for fun and being comfy but some others can be useful, like this one: spyware.neocities.org/
Reposting the themes made by /retro/ anons... >>512 theme: https://pastebin.com/pc7ALb5H Nineties Cheese: https://pastebin.com/kDxC54W6 Would love to see one of those applied by our new BO, the board could use a unique look.
>>410 do you have a neocities? make one man it'll be fun
>>464 Sadly no, or at least not yet. Would love to make one honestly but not sure what kind of content I should put there. Maybe other anons can post their neocities for inspiration?
>>467 http://www.oocities.org/ Just look at actual old geocities websites for inspiration.
>>467 https://hermithermetic.neocities.org/ There's not a whole lot there yet, aside from some literature recommendations and a rant on online censorship. I'm working on content but RL keeps interrupting. Really, just stick with pure, hand-crafted HTML (leaving out at least some of the more modern media features, but don't get tempted to code HTML in obsolete style, it won't work on many browsers) and the design is going to suggest itself as pretty obvious. As for content, just write on your hobbies. You could do retro gaming reviews, for example. Or tutorials on programming C64 homebrew. Whatever you're interested in.
>>467 Fuck it, here's mine https://marevaporum.neocities.org/ >>484 Interesting stuff. Keep up the good work.
>>485 I really like the font and background. And thank you for the link recommendations, I didn't know the citypop YT channel and the internet radio yet.
>>440 Nineties Cheese has been updated with minor fixes. >>484 >hermithermetic Love the theme/colors, very comfy, and the subject is interesting too. Could use a few tweaks though. Mainly better styling of the side buttons, a clear hot spot for the cursor, and right padding for the text body. A favicon for the site would be nice too, I suggest you use the current cursor for that... Want me to give you a hand with those? Also you have a typo in rule 7 >As for content, just write on your hobbies. Hmm, okay then. I'll try to compile some material and make it presentable. >>485 >marevaporum This is nice. Personally I'm not a fan of pixel fonts at all but otherwise your design is good. I would make the blue text body less transparent though, and add a favicon as well. By the way your home background (background1) is actually a JPEG with very visible artifacts saved as a PNG, it would be better if you replaced it with a true PNG. Nice to see other vaporwave fans here.
>>492 Thanks for the tips anon. t. marevaporum
>>24 You're all idiots. Web 1.0 was painful. Do you not realise the pain of using <td>s for everything?
>>484 nice site although initially confusing. I'm still not sure I understand hermeticism haha >>485 huh, I'm already following you. it's always nice to bump into people from one place in another. >>492 what would you say I should fix? https://floppys-lounge.neocities.org/
>>500 >floppys-lounge It's perfect the way it is honestly, your design is a prime example of "less is more". Although you might want to change the color of hovered links to something other than white, because that blends into the background... And maybe add a favicon as well. Did you write the HTML for the blog pages by hand? Or did you use a tool to generate it?
>>440 I made a Burichan/Futaba style CSS theme for Julay that aims to be fairly accurate, for anyone wanting that mid-2000s imageboard experience. I also fixed a couple of bugs/oddities with Julay's default CSS, but I can't guarantee I didn't inadvertantly break anything in the process. Burichan edition (Futaba colors are simply commented out): https://pastebin.com/Mr7eqrUC Futaba edition: https://pastebin.com/aiYcM0pC It's designed to go on top of Julay's Yotsuba B theme, so make sure you have that selected. I also added a few things to make it compatible with Julay's built-in Tomorrow theme, so it should just werk if you select that.
>>506 Who knows, might get implemented soon.
>>507 Oh shit, nice. While you're here, take a look at what I did for the nav bar; by default it's set to "position: fixed", and the board header just uses a top margin to push itself down far enough to prevent overlapping. However, this means that if you reduce the browser window size horizontally enough, the nav bar will increase in vertical size and start covering up the banner (especially if you have quite a few pinned boards). I set the nav bar to "position: sticky" instead, which keeps it on top but also automatically moves everything else to be below it. This means the entire header is always visible no matter how chunky the nav bar gets. One other thing I also noticed with the nav bar is that the the arrow buttons that take you to the tops and bottoms of pages can be pushed outside of the nav bar at certain browser widths, which looks a little janky, but I suspect this might be because they're sitting outside of the div "dynamicHeader". Another fix I did was for the settings window; the default CSS has the outer window width locked to 500px, which leads to the inner resizable text areas going outside of the outer window if you pull them out wide. I reverted that setting and just set a min-width instead, which gives it the more usual and expected behavior. Getting more into autism territory, I also made post names show a text cursor when you hover over them rather than "default", so it's more consistent with the rest of the post info text. Beyond that, I did a lot of unfuckery with margins and paddings, particularly with the post/reply cells. On the default theme they were largely chaotic and nonsensical; all kinds of esoteric sizes, often working against each other or overlapping, which made the whole thing look asymmetrical and nigger-rigged, and made it very difficult to adjust. In my CSS theme, the end result is a lot more neat and simplified, and is now largely "pixel perfect" to halfchan's stock Burichan/Futaba themes. One thing I couldn't do was change the size of image thumbnails, as there's currently no class for them specifically, only for image links and expanded images. I'd like to be able to give thumbnails a max height and width of 128px, without affecting expanded images or the gallery, to really complete the classic look, but it's not possible right now without some sort of thumbnail class.
>>506 This looks comfy, nice work... No quick reply window though? I don't see why it was axed when you're keeping the scrolling navbar. >>509 >One thing I couldn't do was change the size of image thumbnails, as there's currently no class for them specifically Try selecting them with .imgLink > img[src^="/.media/"]
>>510 >No quick reply window though? It should still be there, I'm typing into it now. Only thing I changed with the quick reply was the password text box, as it was overlapping the window after I reverted the text box borders. >.imgLink > img[src^="/.media/"] Thanks, that seems to work well, doesn't seem to affect webm/mp4 thumbnails though.
>>514 >It should still be there I found it, for some reason it spawned off-screen. Not that big of a deal though. >doesn't seem to affect webm/mp4 thumbnails though. For video thumbnails try .imgLink[src$="videomp4"], .imgLink[src$="videowebm"] For audio thumbnails try .imgLink[src$="audioogg"]
>>517 Thanks, that helped catch them. I made a few more adjustments as well: Burichan v1.1: https://pastebin.com/KtgnhHA3 Futaba v1.1: https://pastebin.com/nmJeFRwz You can disable the small images by just deleting or commenting out that whole section, it's at the very bottom.
>>364 Neocities makes me a little sad. When it started I expected it to kickstart a genuine revival in personal pages, but most times I encounter a site now it's just some furry creating a pointless page full of javascript that links to their social media profiles and patreon. A lot of people seem to miss the point entirely. With hindsight it was silly of me to think it'd get random boomers making personal pages reminiscing about their 1970s holidays in Hawaii like they did on Geocities, but I can't shake that disappointment.
>>523 I find it interesting how most of the kids on there aren't even old enough to remember those kinds of websites in their heyday. Same goes for friendproject.net, a myspace clone where the most faggoty teenagers of today roleplay as the most faggoty teenagers of 2006.
>>523 >With hindsight it was silly of me to think it'd get random boomers making personal pages reminiscing about their 1970s holidays in Hawaii like they did on Geocities, but I can't shake that disappointment. It doesn't help that boomers aren't very likely to know about the site in the first place. >>525 >that picture.
>>527 Not to mention, boomers only used Geocities and such because that's all that was available. Because they're lazy like most people, they'll flock to whatever's more convenient to use. And for them, this means Facebook. I doubt we'll see a resurgence of personal webpages in this style because the only appeal it has right now is nostalgia. So the only people that care are computer-science kids and the whole webcore/old-internet/whateverthefuckitscalled culture. And having run into that culture plenty of times, I can tell you it's half furries and trannies. i'd really like to know why but that's for another topic
>>523 There is a revival, however it's very niche and small, And That's A Good Thing!™ Practically speaking, no private individual in this day and age is gonna write HTML pages by hand, let alone with the sole purpose of documenting their thoughts. That leaves autists like us and trannyfags... The problem ones won't stay long because they need attention, and they can get it at much better places (read: github), so you're left with the quiet ones who for the most part are tolerable. It's not a bad scenario, quantity is low and that makes quality stick out. The average joe who made a killer website that's frequently updated is more likely to stick out and set an example than the trannyfag who made an empty page with patreon links... At the end of the day the small community stays true to itself much better than the big community. >>533 You hit the nail on the head, boomers are older than ever now and it's much more convenient for them to just spout their psychobabble on the facebook app where their boomer friends will see it. >And having run into that culture plenty of times, I can tell you it's half furries and trannies. i'd really like to know why but that's for another topic Nothing wrong with discussing it here. Personally I think it's because these types of people tend to be super autistic, so they find enjoyment in peculiar tasks like writing a webpage by hand or using old clunky software/games. Not necessarily a bad thing, they just ruin it with their shitty personality and self presentation.
>used to have a website like 15+ years ago where posted stuff for fun >gave in to the nostalgia and registered on neocities >forgot absolutely everything about html I'm just using the SeaMonkey html editor because its seems like the easiest way to do it, I want a purely minimalistic looking web 1.0 site anyway.
>>541 >forgot absolutely everything about html That's alright, here's a nice WYSIWYG editor that you can use: https://portableapps.com/apps/development/kompozer-portable You won't have to write a single line of HTML, simply insert elements into your page using the various buttons and menus. It's like designing an office document. Pro tip: avoid using tables for non-tabular data, use div containers instead.
>>505 thanks man I try to keep it simple there, I have changed the overall look plenty of times but the weather is getting warmer and I've been watching a lot of Magnum PI reruns so I changed the look to suit my mood haha. >Did you write the HTML for the blog pages by hand? Or did you use a tool to generate it? all by hand baby, I wouldn't have it any other way, at least not for that site. I like organizing things by hand. Didn't think about making a favicon, I'd probably just use an icon of a floppy diskette or something. >>523 There is one site that might be sort of what you're thinking of, https://jackrvn70.neocities.org/ And I gotta say I swear I always find the kind of sites you're talking about, but I think I find them through wiby's random link function. >>525 kek. >>534 yeah I noticed this too. I always found it strange about the trannies and various degenerates having kind of shared interests with me. I'm not sure why they do. Speaking for myself I can say I am the way I am because I don't like the way the modern world is going, whereas for the mentally ill /sodomite crowd I can't pin down why they're prevalent in this niche given that it's exactly the modern state of society that enables and encourages their illnesses. And, of course, people like them are a huge contributing factor to why everything is going to hell lately. Not to blame the victims of course, they aren't the root cause of all these issues. Still strange to see them around where I wouldn't expect, but then again the Internet was a mistake and probably is a huge contributor to mental illness in general.
>>552 >Internet was a mistake Agreed honestly.
>>555 based and checked
>>552 >Speaking for myself I can say I am the way I am because I don't like the way the modern world is going The trannies' world isn't getting any better either, but that's because (1) they're bringing it upon themselves by progressively fucking their body up with hormones/surgery, and (2) they're delusional enough to think that everyone other than them is a nazi who's part of some secret 4th reich... Unlike the Good Old Days™ when they didn't know what a nazi was, which was coincidentally the same time they used Windows 95 and surfed the old web. >the Internet was a mistake Nah the internet was a blessing, just because it was misused by faggots and corporates doesn't mean it's a bad thing.
http://jbr.me.uk/ A very cool, old but still updated, site about conlangs and sci-fi.
Some particular sites I miss/remember; Radio 3net had a complete ad-free classic albums from all kind of genres, it still exists but without the albums of course. There was also video streaming site of Divx which had free anime episodes in HD quality, unfortunately I couldn't find archived image of that site. Finally, Emuparadise which still exists, but no longer have games. Copyrightsniggers truly contributed to the death of the (free) internet. The death of the old internet just escalated my understating that everything I love and hold dear would eventually die. https://www.invidio.us/watch?v=XJgRp4uuAww P.S. sorry for the non-genuine retro song, it just fit the overall feel of this post >>552 >>555 >>558 >>Internet was a mistake All good things come to an end and everything will die and be forgotten
>>597 >Finally, Emuparadise which still exists, but no longer have games. The games are still there, in a way. They just removed the download links apparently. It's still possible to download them using some workaround.
>>598 >The games are still there, in a way The info about the games, not the games themselves. >It's still possible to download them using some workaround Please elaborate
>>599 >Please elaborate The website still hosts the ROMs, but removed the links. This is a script to access said links: https://gist.github.com/Eptun/3fdcc84552e75e452731cd4621c535e9/raw/d1dcc00185085ce10df8bebcc2a640fd01ef9058/emuparadise.eptun.user.js How to use: install the Violentmonkey extension for your browser (or similar) then navigate to the link above.
>>600 Thanks anon.
This is a cool guide to navigating the Internet from 1991. Includes stuff on Usenet, IRC, MUDS, FTP, and more. Big Dummy's Guide to the Internet A round trip through Global Networks, Newsgroups, and Everything..., Texinfo Edition 1.00, @value{update-month} https://www.bsd.org/bdgtti/bdgtti_toc.html
>>638 Nice! Thanks for sharing, any way to download a local copy of this?
Internet Archive may die due to copyrightsniggers https://blog.archive.org/2020/06/01/four-commercial-publishers-filed-a-complaint-about-the-internet-archives-lending-of-digitized-books/ Download and save everything you can before the great burn down
>>651 If this goes south, will they remove everything, or just the books? At least there's libgen for books, but almost everything else on the archive (websites, movies, software...etc) is not mirrored anywhere. There was an attempt to backup the whole website by "Archive Team" but it's been on hiatus since 2016: https://archiveteam.org/index.php?title=INTERNETARCHIVE.BAK I personally backed up some software, but of course it's nowhere near enough. Hopefully a coordinated project will be set up before it's too late...
>>652 >If this goes south, will they remove everything, or just the books? Removing the content is much less of problem than the possibility of getting bankrupted by being sued by four of the biggest publishing companies. >but of course it's nowhere near enough. Hopefully a coordinated project will be set up before it's too late... It's nearly impossible to back up such an enormous amount of data in such a short time. Hopefully, the public won't let it happen, but "coincidentally" everyone's eyes set on the nignogs riots in USA right now.
>>651 Update: the IA went back to the "traditional" book lending model, hopefully the publishers will calm the fuck down. http://blog.archive.org/2020/06/10/temporary-national-emergency-library-to-close-2-weeks-early-returning-to-traditional-controlled-digital-lending/ https://archive.vn/pAZ5Z
Just found out this exists: https://oneterabyteofkilobyteage.tumblr.com Most sites are still available using wayback machine too. Pretty good shit. please board don't die
>>669 Nice screenshots on there. The blog also links to some kind of Geocities restoration project: https://blog.geocities.institute This reminds me of when I downloaded a part of the "Geocities archive torrent" looking for a certain website, only to find out it wasn't archived. :( I did stumble upon some other cool websites in the downloaded part though...
>>674 >only to find out it wasn't archived. We all need some kind of distributed, discoverable, archiving system that can take the place of the wayback machine and the archive.today domains. Wayback is under attack again, and archive.today has been hiding behind the enemy of humanity (((Cuckflare))), and are therefore useless for Tor users, and pozzed af anyway. We should start with IBs of today, but also include /retro/-esque assets as well. They need to be distributed on personal boxes so they don't present a single point of failure for takedowns and other evil attacks.
>>674 >>669 pretty comfy >>675 yeah, the main thing is having a good system in place to access those files or share them. I'm willing to bet between a lot of users, we'd have plenty of storage space to archive a lot of things and have copies. But it's worthless if not everyone can find it again. I think boards and forums are a pretty good way to share stuff though. Asking a bunch of people usually turns up better results than a search engine especially the pozzed results engines give nowadays.
>>690 Agreed. The problem with forums, etc., is they are centralized points that are targets for attack. A distributed, discoverable, archiving system will both answer the basic needs you mentioned, as well as being much more resistant to some lazy-assed Esther-esque or glownigger attack, and being more resilient to bounce back in the event of one. Think "Whack-a-Mole" game as far as that last point.
>>695 yes exactly, that's why I find that just talking to people on a random forum is a pretty decent way to learn and find stuff.
>>675 >>690 >>695 Maybe IPFS can be leveraged to make such an archive possible? I'm not very savvy when it comes to non-centralized means of archival, but I've downloaded files using IPFS quite a few times before and it was smooth.
>>702 Good point Anon. Hydrus is one kind of tool that might be able to provide some inspiration/guidance on a good toolset to devise. It supports IPFS also. My thinking atm is more geared towards individual hidden services somehow networked together similar to the way BitTorrent works. RetroShare might be a good idea, as well as ''bitmessage.
>>246 I just dropped by here to see if the board was still active, and I happened to see this post while scrolling. Thank you so much for preserving this game, anon.
>>246 >This game gave me hope that there's a way to repackage old Shockwave games into standalone EXEs, perhaps using old versions of Macromedia SW. If you are still around Anon (or anyone else interested for that matter) I feel pretty confident that my friends at /f/ can tell you the answer to that question, with specifics. https://anon.cafe/f/res/4.html
>>709 I'll check it out, although I would prefer if some of these anons came here to give /retro/ some much needed traffic.
>>713 go there and shill for us mate
Here is a website hosted by an elderly man who has the same hobby I do. http://www.panix.com/~bartlett/
>>577 Don't use the c-word. It is a zoomer magnet. The proper term for the art of language invention is "glossopoeia". http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Glosso/Glossopoeia.html
>>820 that's a nice page. Although I have to say all this language stuff comes across as pure autism to me, haha. Not in such a bad way--one man's autism is another's passion, isn't it?
Open file (374.02 KB 918x975 ClipboardImage.png)
Open file (648.03 KB 918x975 ClipboardImage.png)
Perhaps you guys would be interested, I made a website on neocities for vaporwave music, complete with 88x31 buttons and a winamp player which uses javascript check it out sometime. https://loa2k.neocities.org/
>>857 >New World™ flacs I was looking everywhere for those. Thanks.
>>859 Glad to help! NW is one of my all time favorite albums.
>>857 pretty sweet anon, thanks.
I made a forum thats suppose to give the look of an old Macintosh OS 8, Its a vaporwave community https://forum.agoraroad.com/index.php
Open file (762.32 KB 1903x662 Adult Swim Games.png)
I thought of playing some old adult swim games before flash die and I saw this cancer instead...are we desktopfags are dying breed or simply cannot be monetized like phoneniggers and consolefags?
>>914 >are we desktopfags are dying breed Yes, unfortunately. Phone cancer is the norm nowadays, and desktop computers are most likely only going to become an increasingly niche thing from here on out.
>>913 Didn't Apple open up their OS to the PC hardware crowd for a period while Jobs was out?
>>915 I checked the regular cartoon network site, they still have games, but they're inferior trash to what they used to have just like their cartoons. BTW, Nitrome is now converting their old desktop flash games to html5 at least, they have an excuse for cucking the flashpoint project from including them in the game list, assholes . >desktop computers will become a thing for programfags and maybe artfags only which will make desktop more expensive and harder to get >technology will continue to get more pozzed and bloated Is there any anon who work on time machine that can get us all back? I want to go back, I want to live in infinite loop of 90's-2000's and maybe early 2010' before the cancer vastly spread and then die.
Open file (2.61 MB 5493x2376 1415282518571.jpg)
>>917 >I want to go back, I want to live in infinite loop of 90's-2000's and maybe early 2010' before the cancer vastly spread and then die. I wish the period we were living in was just a more technologically advanced version of the late 20th century. The only modern things I'm interested in tend to draw heavily from the past anyway, even if they take things in a different direction. It feels to me like things have hit a brick wall aesthetically. This brown maelstrom of smartphones, social media, yoga pants, and digitally over-processed media is so lame and off-putting to me. Everything feels like it's designed by a committee of neutered bourgeois bohemians who embrace ugliness in the name of being as inoffensive as possible. Having standards is oppressive and problematic. Ideally I'd like to separate myself from it completely and live like all this garbage didn't exist. It's too bad intentional communities wouldn't be an option for this stuff.
Open file (126.32 KB 960x720 a.jpg)
>>920 >Everything feels like it's designed by a committee of neutered bourgeois bohemians who embrace ugliness in the name of being as inoffensive as possible. It's true. Reading Greek philosophy, I see constant mentions of beauty, it's constantly sought after everywhere in Greek texts. It's a stark contrast to CY+6, the age of sculpted uglyness. >Our own hearts bear us witness that we, too, from our boyhood up, have been trained in the school of beauty and nobleness and honour, and now let us go forward to meet our foes. >But when he saw it he said: "Nay, you must not make me a mercenary and a benefactor for pay; take this treasure back and hie you home, but do not give it to your lord that he may bury it again; spend it on your son, and send him forth gloriously equipped for war, and with the residue buy yourself and for your husband and your children such precious things as shall endure, and bring joy and beauty into all your days. >Therefore Cyrus ordered his whole force to assemble under arms, and drew them up into battle-array, using all his skill to make the display a wonder of beauty and perfection. Some quotes from The Upbringing of Cyrus. But we can still read texts from before Christ, and we can still consume the beauty and superior quality from before times we can consider modern in whatever field we're dealing with. It's still perfectly possible and in fact the best way to program using ANSI C, from 1989. And you can still do it on the BSDs, projects started in the 80s. Nobody is making anything new there, but we can still watch anime from the 1970s-1990s. Pirating movies from the 60s-early 90s is still perfectly possible, and we can also do this with anime, we can watch them on blu-ray with fancy upscaler algorithms. The only thing other than some aspects of technology I can really recall had anything nice happen to it in the 2000s or later was vidya, and that's confined to the first half of the decade. Early 2000s vidya is my favorite too. Again, nothing new of that sort coming out, but early 2000s vidya is still reachable. And emulation is at a golden age right now, the emulators for SNES, Genesis, those 2D consoles in general are of absurdly high quality these days.
Open file (329.94 KB 1280x1060 Hiroshi_Nagai_9.jpg)
>>921 >Nobody is making anything new there, but we can still watch anime from the 1970s-1990s. >Pirating movies from the 60s-early 90s is still perfectly possible, and we can also do this with anime, we can watch them on blu-ray with fancy upscaler algorithms. My plan right now it actually to buy a massive hard external hard drive for archival purposes. I already have an 8 TB hard drive that's almost filled up with various things, so I'm going to get an even bigger one to preserve as many movies and TV shows from the past as possible that even vaguely interest me. Even corny sitcoms I look back on fondly but wouldn't want to rewatch nowadays. I already have a decent movie selection of movie rips that goes back to A Trip to the Moon and some of D.W. Griffith's work. I think we're going to see some hard crackdowns coming soon, so I want to be as prepared for the future as possible. Streaming services can go cram it. >The only thing other than some aspects of technology I can really recall had anything nice happen to it in the 2000s or later was vidya, and that's confined to the first half of the decade. Early 2000s vidya is my favorite too. Again, nothing new of that sort coming out, but early 2000s vidya is still reachable. PC games definitely went downhill after that point for me, and those are the ones I enjoy the most. I already have most of the games I want, whether through GOG, DOSBox, Steam, or through open-source re-implementations (although one I was looking forward to got forcibly shut down recently). >And emulation is at a golden age right now, the emulators for SNES, Genesis, those 2D consoles in general are of absurdly high quality these days. Yeah. When it comes to console games, I'm mainly into the 8-bit and 16-bit systems, and now that I have MiSTer and flash carts as options for those I'd gladly sell off all the games in my collection that don't have nostalgic value for me. Technological advances have made it easier than ever to have access to the best of the past as far as things like books, movies, TV, games, and music go. Too bad it doesn't help change the aesthetic repulsiveness of the 21st century in a broader sense. Most people don't even seem to understand all the great things they have access to and would rather just take whatever is currently dangled in front of their face.
>>920 It's interesting that for you it's mostly an aesthetics issue, whereas for me it's mostly functionality issue. >I wish the period we were living in was just a more technologically advanced version of the late 20th century Can you elaborate please? That's sounds intriguing. >>921 >we can watch them on blu-ray with fancy upscaler algorithms Aren't most of Blu-ray adaptions are bad? Especially for cel animation in which they remove the gradient/"noise" and either make everything too bright or dull?
>>923 >It's interesting that for you it's mostly an aesthetics issue, whereas for me it's mostly functionality issue. It's really a mix of both, but aesthetics for me are definitely a huge gripe. I even remember disliking the turn things took in the late '90s when I wasn't very old. >Can you elaborate please? That's sounds intriguing. Keeping the aesthetics of the last few decades of the last century (or even before) while still retaining the technological advancements that have been made since then (although not necessarily having them in wide use). Unfortunately, there's no going back. Every society is shaped by the circumstances in which it exists, including the technological ones. The technological limitations compared to what we know nowadays are one of the things that give those years their character. Maybe some day there will be another golden age, but I don't think I'll ever able to appreciate it to the same extent.
>>923 Yes, that's often the case. There are often all sorts of technical mistakes because people who are competent with video and audio are rare. Most who are actually doing the job for the companies selling disc releases are incompetent and either apathetic or satisfied with saying "it's subjective" and then half-assing it. Most photographers don't know how to take a picture, and even those who know things like aperture think they're knobs you twist until you get an effect rather than tools for squeezing the most accurate picture out of the camera. You can expect the same thing out of people dealing with video and audio. There's also the issue of corporate culture where they will use the corporate product to get the job done, which is rarely any good. The disc standards are very horribly made and easy to mess up. For instance, DVD has no progressive mode, there's only a word-of-mouth standard where you telecine progressive footage and hope the player either figures it out (telecining can be detected, but also misdetected) or your DVD sends the player some sort of proprietary signal. DVD is a literal computer that you can program with a special assembly language, this assembly language is how DVD menus and unskippable copyright notices are made. DVD also has rectangular pixels. This and more creates a lot of traps that the great majority of DVD makers fall into. Then there's the issue of remastering the film correctly. Whoever remastered Evangelion for instance forgot to calibrate the colors of the tool they used, and the resulting image is tinted. And there's the issue of preserving the film. If you store it poorly, it will deteriorate. As you mentioned there's the misguided filtering. For broken disc relases, see: Dragon Ball, Crusher Joe, Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Slayers TV series, Evangelion, Saint Seiya, Excel Saga, Sailor Moon (there's a DVD release that's actually good, but the blu-rays suck), Dirty Pair, Terminator, Star Wars. I have a general feeling most home video releases are bad, certainly most of the ones I watched. There are good disc releases however, and there are fixable releases also. A lot of pirate encoders fix mistakes in the official release, one such release for instance is Evangelion. There are multiple fan encodes with the color issue fixed. I mostly watch anime, I know at least 2 good western releases, but I think those are the only ones I ever watched that were good. For anime there are so many I can't recall all, for good or fixable and fixed in a pirate encode releases check out Terra e..., Lodoss, Gunbuster, Maison Ikkoku, Escaflowne, the original Tenchi Muyo OVAs, Urusei Yatsura, Slayers OVAs, Macross, Tokimeki Tonight (actually a web release), Arion, Iczer-1, Megazone 23, Magic Knight Rayearth, Angel's Egg, Kimagure Orange Road. Beware incompetent pirate encoders also exist, and they can make poor encodes or filter the image. All the fan encodes of Urusei Yatsura are heavily filtered for instance. There are 2 funny trends I have noticed. First, some movies are so old that the makers had no chance of butchering the image, they didn't have computers to do it with. Filtering an image in the old days was putting a red glass pane in front of the prism you're burning your image into the film with so it's tinted red. If you look at an old movie like 2001: A Space Odyssey or Back to the Future, the image couldn't possibly be desaturated until it was composed of dark shades of bluish grey like a modern movie. They didn't have a computer to do that with. The colors are all perfect, and those movies also happen to have actually good blu-ray releases that are true to the original. Second, some movies have only ever been released in good quality on analog cinema. From when cinema video was done with a film roll and a projector. There's even a project trying to create a fan remaster Star Wars from old cinema reels https://www.thestarwarstrilogy.com/project-4k77/ because all the official home releases are terrible.
>>925 >There's even a project trying to create a fan remaster Star Wars from old cinema reels https://www.thestarwarstrilogy.com/project-4k77/ because all the official home releases are terrible. I'm not a huge Star Wars fan, but it's great that people are doing stuff like that. I have Harmy's Despecialized Edition of the trilogy, but I'll have to get these when all three movies are finished. I'd hoped that Disney would have done something like this a long time ago when they got the rights, but they seemed to have dropped the ball on absolutely everything.
>>924 It sounds less vague now, thanks. >while still retaining the technological advancements that have been made since then (although not necessarily having them in wide use) Yeah, that's unrealistic wish; a world where niggerphones, social networks and emails aren't necessity and an extend of the real world, I would love to go back to that time. We truly live in cyberpunk era without even realizing it since it's not exciting and full of thrills like we been lied to by various fiction and other commercialism as the nature of reality is and always be dull and not glamorous despite all the lies pushed to say otherwise and give hope and meaning to the average normalfag. >Unfortunately, there's no going back. Every society is shaped by the circumstances in which it exists, including the technological ones. The technological limitations compared to what we know nowadays are one of the things that give those years their character Uncle Ted was right >Maybe some day there will be another golden age I doubt it would ever happen, I can't see a way to push away big tech and restore the internet to it glory days before the normalfag and corporate cancer. Maybe if we will have teleports in the future we could go back to using more analog low tech again (papers, etc). >>925 Thank you so much for your very detailed and informative answer! It's also impressive you have great eye for noticing such small differences. >Most who are actually doing the job for the companies selling disc releases are incompetent and either apathetic or satisfied with saying "it's subjective" and then half-assing it Totally, Batman Beyond got a Blu-Ray last year and the faggots were bullshitting about "how the creators originally wanted to make everything brighter", so all the cel episodes are completely smooth and bright I wonder how come no one on twatter whined about whitwashing the black characters, maybe BB is safe from SJW? Probably not, but I'd like to think that and the digital episodes have yellow tint and sometimes are too bright as well. I doubt there are enough fans to fix it like in Star Wars and Anime cases. P.S. Sounds relevant to modern web design too. >I know at least 2 good western releases, but I think those are the only ones I ever watched that were good What are they, may I ask? >There are good disc releases however, and there are fixable releases also. A lot of pirate encoders fix mistakes in the official release Can you please explain how to find such releases/downloads? Thanks in advance!
>>928 >What are they, may I ask? They're mentioned further down, 2001: A Space Odyssey and Back to the Future. I just remembered, there's a series of disc releases of western movies called The Criterion Collection and the people behind it seem competent. I've seen a few pictures of other movies in the series and they looked good, but ultimately the only movie in it I watched was Goodfellas and that also had an excellent release. The Amazon release of Dukes of Hazzard is also very good. On the anime side there's a company called Discotek which has been buying the rights of several franchises and releasing them excellently for a while now. Here's Galaxy Express 999 for instance. >Can you please explain how to find such releases/downloads? Torrent sites and a bit of digging. Here's Dragon Ball with the original broadcast audio and some video fixes https://nyaa.si/view/1283101 What happened to that series was the official audio in the DVDs is a terribly low quality recording the owners of the series had, the original is either lost or the people making the DVDs weren't allowed to touch it. But back in the 1980s it was common for Japanese otaku to record shows as they aired on VHS tapes, back then if you didn't catch something on TV you'd be left unable to watch it for a long time. It turned out it paid off because many home recordings of the series are much superior to the audio officially released on DVD, so pirates managed to dig out a superior recording that not even the people behind the DVDs had access to. The "Dragon Ball broadcast audio" is a famous incident, if you web search it there'll be a lot of results. That release also has video fixes. Here's an encode I made https://nyaa.net/view/1036974?PageSpeed=noscript. The original DVD has a mixture of telecining and interlacing, I don't know if there's a DVD player out there that can detect switches between telecining and interlacing and deal with them properly on the fly but I doubt it, certainly the software video player MPV couldn't figure it out with the .iso I pirated and the other fan encodes didn't fix the problem. I made a fixed encode. There's also a device called the Domesday Duplicator which can rip LaserDiscs in better quality than anything else. The way it works is that they tap the signal sent by the laser of a real LaserDisc player, and then they use a software LaserDisc player emulator to decode this recording, and by doing this in this way instead of letting the LaserDisc player decode the disc and recording the player's output the resulting video is much superior. https://www.domesday86.com/ I just found this plebbit post about some discord faggots who seem to be planning to use this device to rip LOGH after a quick google https://www.reddit.com/r/logh/comments/kyrus0/i_am_excited_to_announce_legend_of_the_galactic/ I don't know of any releases that have used this device however. Another thing people have been doing is take upscaled video, figure out the algorithm and the variables fed to the algorithm used to upscale it (which thanks to corporate incompetence 99% of the time is either Bilinear or Bicubic with the default settings of some random software) and then downscale this footage with an approximation of the opposite of the upscaler algorithms to hopefully get the best reconstruction of the original resolution footage, which is then either released as is and upscaling is left to the final consumer or upscaled back with a superior algorithm for better quality. There's a forum called doom9 where encoder people teach each other this stuff and write sofware tools to do these sorts of tasks https://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=174849 Just check out some titles in the forum: https://forum.doom9.org/forumdisplay.php?f=33
Open file (877.38 KB 1850x1825 post-3819-129547732549.jpg)
>>928 >Yeah, that's unrealistic wish; a world where niggerphones, social networks and emails aren't necessity and an extend of the real world, I would love to go back to that time. I think it would be a hard adjustment for most people to make, including myself. I'd love to go back to the Wild West days of the old Internet, but I don't think even a potentially decentralized Internet of the future would even have the same feeling. >We truly live in cyberpunk era without even realizing it since it's not exciting and full of thrills like we been lied to by various fiction and other commercialism as the nature of reality is and always be dull and not glamorous despite all the lies pushed to say otherwise and give hope and meaning to the average normalfag. I'm not a fan of the cyberpunk aesthetic, but at least cyberpunk had a cool grittiness to it. What we're experiencing now is like a bland, emasculated version of that. Sure, people tend to expect ugliness out of dystopias. But those are often the cool kind of ugly, with imposing brutalist architecture, stylish propaganda posters, and stern-looking soldiers in menacing uniforms patrolling the streets and hunting down resisters. What do we have now? Nu-minimalist art with POCs in wheelchairs? Insipid ukulele-and-whistling stock music? Somehow a society populated with repulsive buttertrolls with Day-Glo hair destroying people's lives over hurt feelings just can't compete with the more traditional vision of a future you'd want to avoid. But yeah, reality always fails to live up to the exciting images we have in our heads. That even goes for things none of us would ever want to experience. That WWI-era quote about war being long periods of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror comes to mind. >Uncle Ted was right I don't see any way of closing Pandora's box now that it's been opened. By giving up technological advancement, a society would be creating an international prisoner's dilemma type of situation that would make it vulnerable to societies that aren't willing to give it up. >I doubt it would ever happen, I can't see a way to push away big tech and restore the internet to it glory days before the normalfag and corporate cancer. Maybe if we will have teleports in the future we could go back to using more analog low tech again (papers, etc). If there is one, I don't think we'll really be able to predict what it would look like. Short of humanity being destroyed or the world's energy sources being burned through before a suitable replacement can be found, at some point things will have to bounce back to an extent. Even a completely totalitarian 1984-style society wouldn't be able to hold on forever, although we might be long dead by the time it would collapse. On the other hand, maybe artificial general intelligence could be a useful asset to tyrannical governments if it's ever implemented.
>>925 >>929 Hey anon, you seem to be pretty knowledgeable about video & encoding. Could you help me out with one thing? I've been into this old MTV show called AMP, but all the copies available online are shit (240p, low bitrate, the video is basically mush). By some miracle I found some guy who dumped his dvds on soulseek and amongst them were a few eps of AMP, recorded from a tape. No transcoding, he literally just dumped the VIDEO_TS folder. So once I'm finished downloading I'd like to convert it to something more reasonable (like webm) and deinterlace it, but I have no fucking clue how to do this. I have ffmpeg, but I'm not an encoding expert, generally the most I can do with ffmpeg is to cut a video or sth. Here's a sample of the video in question: http://0x0.st/-ij_.mpeg
>>931 Make sure to read the manual of every utility you use. A TV recording is usually interlaced rather than telecined. This is interlaced. To rip DVDs I recommend mplayer, it's clunky to use and has its limitations, which are not at all helped by how bad of a format DVD is, but it gets the job done. If you do it well the only thing missing will be the chapters, I don't know of a FLOSS tool that can rip DVD chapters. mplayer is a video player with a ripping feature, you can tell it to dump a DVD's title. DVDs have what are called angles, titles and chapters. Usually every title is either a whole episode (or the whole movie if it's a movie) or a copyright notice, an ad, or the menu video. Usually. This is the exact command line I used to rip a test DVD just now: >mplayer -dumpfile ~/test.vob -sid 0 -dumpstream dvd://2 -dvd-device /mnt/ Every one of those options is in mplayer's manual. One detail that you will see from the "dvd://2" part is that I ripped the 2nd title, because the 1st title was actually the DVD menu. In this case it's a very well done DVD for a multiple episode anime called Maps, and in this DVD every episode is a title. mplayer won't rip subtitles by default, you have to specify a subtitle id with -sid. Often, including in this DVD, titles are split into multiple files within the DVD. mplayer will sort it out for you and output a single .vob file. This single .vob file is easier to manipulate with ffmpeg, you can also use the ffmpeg concat filter to get the same result, but then ffmpeg alone doesnt automate nearly as much of the job. The .iso file was mounted on the /mnt/ directory. Inside /mnt/ is the VIDEO_TS directory, i.e /mnt/VIDEO_TS. After that, it seems ffmpeg can read the concatenated file properly. The result is a .vob file which is ready to be manipulated with ffmpeg to do whatever you need to do with it. I'm just going to pretend that my example file is your example file for a second, you can turn any format into any other format very easily with ffmpeg. It's one of the simplest ffmpeg use cases. >ffmpeg -i test.vob -c:a copy -c:v copy video.mpeg Now comes the part where the DVD is finished. >ffmpeg -i video.mpeg -vf yadif,scale=720:540 -c:v libx264 -preset:v slow -b:v 2000k -c:a copy -map 0:v -map 0:a video.mkv Here's the output file, video.mpeg was the file you linked, video.mkv is the result from that command line: https://x0.at/dG5.mkv All of those options are also on ffmpeg's manual. After ripping the DVD you can either undo the interlacing or tag the file appropriately (your mpeg file is already tagged perfectly, I checked it) and leave the deinterlacing to the video player. All the video codecs currently in use lose efficiency when fed interlaced footage, so if you will reencode you should take the chance to also deinterlace. The video already doesn't look good, I'd just mux it as is into a mkv file. The example reencodes. The algorithm used for fixing deinterlacing matters, better ones give better quality. ffmpeg supports a good one called NNEDI. Because of some licensing nonsense the manual tells you to download a file the algorithm needs to work from github, if you can't do that use yadif. Everything is in ffmpeg's manual. Generally, you shouldn't touch DVD audio. DVD uses a lossy audio codec called AC3, there's no point in reencoding it to a lossless codec because it'll increase the filesize, and it's very undesirable to encode it to another lossy format because there'll be a huge quality reduction. Lossy audio codecs in general use tricks to make your brain not notice the quality loss, whereas video codecs hide detail your eyes don't pay attention to. Lossily encoding already lossy audio breaks the illusion and there's a lot of added loss, while on the other hand you can take a jpeg screenshot of some video and have trouble telling apart your lossy screenshot from the lossy material it was taken from. Another thing you can do is scale the video to make the pixels square, bad (software and hardware) video players which can't handle rectangular pixels are everywhere. Rectangular pixels also cause trouble with the video codecs and reduce efficiency, so it's generally a good idea to get rid of them when reencoding. A NTSC DVD's resolution is 720x480 and the aspect ratio is 4:3. If you scale it to a 4:3 resolution its rectangular pixels will be stretched to squares. Don't downscale the video to 640:480, upscale it to 720:540. By downscaling, you're discarding detail. By upscaling, you're extrapolating detail. The slight upscale is closer to the original than the slight downscale. 720:540 also happens to be exactly a quarter of 1080p, most upscaler algorithms perform better and discard less data when scaling integer multiples, and 1080p and 4k seem to be the more popular screen resolutions these days. The ideal would be to leave the original resolution intact and let the player upscale the original rectangular pixels to your screen's resolution at the proper aspect ratio, but to avoid trouble it's best to take that 720:540 step. And finally, yet another common quirk among video players is being unable to play streams where the audio comes before the video. In fact, most imageboards won't even allow you to upload such a file. In your file, the audio happens to come before the video. The "-map" options I used fix that.
>>932 >mplayer Just to be sure, do you mean this https://mplayerhq.hu/design7/news.html ?
>>932 Also what are your thoughts on Handbrake - https://handbrake.fr/ ? Seems more retard friendly
Woah, I expected a response, but not an entire blogpost! But yeah, thanks for the verbosity, I actually learned a thing or two. I did some testing and while yadif did muddy things a little bit, I can't find any differences between the image ran through nnedi and source, so I think I'll go with that partial reencoding (especially since it effectively halfs the filesize) rather than just muxing. I'll make sure to drop a link here after I'm done with encoding/reordering/uploading. Thanks again, that was incredibly helpful!
>>933 Yes. >>934 I haven't used it, I hear it has good defaults. Video and audio manipulation involves so much repetition with slight changes every now and then that GUIs are specially ill suited for these sorts of tasks. Usually in the commandline you can script it, turning days of repetitive labor and inefficient use of the computer into writing a script and letting the computer do its thing on its own. With a GUI you have to hope there's a tool for automating your specific use case and that this tool is compatible with other tools you're using, you probably won't find any tool to do most of what you want. For instance, I happened to be making a Galaxy Express remux as I made these posts, it's finished now: https://nyaa.net/view/1039110 The blu-rays are a bit janky. They have multiple playlists, only one of which is the anime itself. Other playlists were credits, ads, and some extras that shouldn't be included in my release like a recording of a tape of a dub pilot that never bore fruit. There is one playlist containing all the episodes on the disc, which is not consistently the same playlist, it was always either the playlist number 0 or the playlist number 1. This one playlist has between 51 and 66 chapters depending on the disc, every group of 5 chapters is an episode, the very last chapter on most discs (not all) was mastering credits, and there are a total of 9 blu-ray discs. I wasn't able to find a tool to properly split what I needed split without manually doing everything, and I didn't even look much for such a tool, so I pieced together a few command line tools. I used mplayer to probe the disc, then I used sed to parse mplayer's output and grab the number of the longest playlist and the chapter count of every bd, then I used seq to generate a sequence of numbers that matched the chapter that separated episodes, then I used mkvmerge's commandline interface to split the playlist number I grabbed at the chapter numbers I generated. After that, I had a folder for each disc with every episode separated into its own file. Optical storage in general is terrible at reading at varying speeds, and adding the hardware to buffer video to players costs money, so blu-rays are purposefully engineered so the encoded content has very little bitrate variation. I knew upfront all the episodes would have a similar size, and indeed all the Galaxy Express episodes on these discs are between 3GB and 3.4GB in size, but the mastering credits were far smaller than that at 140MB, so I used a command called find to delete every file below 200MB. I wrote a quick shell loop to take every file I ripped and reencode the audio to FLAC from PCM with ffmpeg, then run mkvpropedit through the file to add some statistics a few video players benefit from, which left me with the final files I'd release. The files when sorted alphabetically were in the right order, but their names were working names and improper for release. For instance episode 2 from set 1's disc 2 was called "set1d2-002.mkv". That's also easy to fix in shell. I used the find program to build a list of files, sorted it with a program called sort, and fed this list to an awk script I wrote which kept a count of how many files it was fed and generated a filename with a template I made, using the current count of files as the episode number. Imagine doing all of that manually. The scripting must have taken less than an hour total, all the processing took about a day on my toaster. GUI tools would have been more manual and involve downtime where the computer wouldn't be doing anything while I pressed the right buttons.
>>928 >push away big tech and restore the internet to it glory days This may be far-fetched but I speculate one of the "alternative internets" (i2p, freenet, zeronet...etc) will take off in the coming years and catapult us back to the online wild west days. Also because these networks are slow and a lot of their users don't enable javascript -for security reasons- we may just as well see a rise of "classic" websites that are just plain HTML and CSS... One can dream. >>930 > don't think even a potentially decentralized Internet of the future would even have the same feeling. I think it would, because early internet wasn't a breeze to access back then, which is the case for decentralized networks nowadays. With growing popularity there will be fine tuned browsers and apps that make it easier to use, to a degree of course, because we don't want normalfags getting in too easily. >>936 Could you upload your scripts for us? Personally I'd love to learn all the command line magic as I feel I'm not making full use of my linux machine.
>>937 >I think it would, because early internet wasn't a breeze to access back then, which is the case for decentralized networks nowadays. With growing popularity there will be fine tuned browsers and apps that make it easier to use, to a degree of course, because we don't want normalfags getting in too easily. I hope so, but I think it would lack a lot of the charming naivete and earnestness of the early Internet.
>>942 Good, so we can avoid doing the same things that ruined the internet the first time around.
>>943 It's absolutely necessary that people learn from experience, but at the same time I'm tired of people hiding behind seven layers of irony and acting like they're too cool for everything. Even I find myself doing that.

Report/Delete/Moderation Forms
Delete
Report

Captcha (required for reports)

no cookies?