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Legoman 10/07/2019 (Mon) 22:56:11 No.25
I've been wondering, you hear about figurines manufacturer all the time, things like those guys who create custom Warhammer statuettes and the like, but I've never seen LEGO specialists.

Basically what I'm asking is:
-What are the tools used by LEGO modders to make their own brick sets and Lego people?
-Are there online tools?
-Are there behind the scenes into LEGO creation? As in, videos of the creative process behind designing a set/legokin, marketing/focus groups and actual production thereof?
-Who are the LEGO engineers that decide how many bricks should a building have?
>>25
>legokin
I misread this as being the same kind of thing as a legosona like a fursona and now I feel dirty.
>>26
you should feel filthy.
>>26
I wish I had never read this
>>25
lol
I just wanted to use a name that sounded better than Legoman but I don't wanna use it no more
>>25
Those are some interesting questions, but I don't think you can find many solid leads. Lego guards their design process very safely to prevent competitors from finding out everything. The most I know of is that official Lego designers create large sculpts (some pieces are even hand sculpted) and then scale it down to minifigure size when it comes to production. If you want, I can take photos of a few pages out of Lego books that show this.
>>25
Didn't the Lego Club magazines have a few interviews with brickmasters?
>>34
>The most I know of is that official Lego designers create large sculpts (some pieces are even hand sculpted) and then scale it down to minifigure size when it comes to production. If you want, I can take photos of a few pages out of Lego books that show this.
Wow, that'd be so fucking cool! Please do!
>>37
I never had one, sadly.
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>>37
I have all the Lego Club magazines from 2007-2017 and there aren't any interviews in there. There was an interview with the lead bloke behind Lego Star Wars III. but that was the closest to a brickmaster. The Club magazines are basically adverts with a few comics an activities thrown in. I'm sure fan magazines will have interviews, but I don't own any unfortunately.

>>39
Sorry if some of the pages are slightly out of focus, the pages kept moving.
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>>40
>>41
This is very fascinating. Thanks for sharing!
So in essence, they take a base minifigure and edit over it. Seems pretty straightforward and maybe that's why they're always so good to look at. Interesting that they use so little colors to keep the designs from being cluttered.
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>>40
>5th pic
The memes write themselves
>>45
No problem, I'm glad to help and share. I find it interesting that even back in 1990 they were still using hand made wooden prototypes at a 5:1 scale.

>>46
Saved and thanks for the laugh
>>46
That's a very nice Fluorescent American you've posted.
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>>45
Another thing I found out is that when they are first designing the minifigures of a theme, they put the torso prints on stickers.
>printed parts are VERY expensive to produce, particularly minifigs. The most expensive part LEGO produces is the printed minifig torso.
From: https://www.brothers-brick.com/2008/03/10/brothers-brickcom-interviews-chris-giddens-and-mark-sandlin/
>For Power Miners we...changed a model in Photoshop into about thirty different colour combinations and carried out a little consumer testing
https://www.brothers-brick.com/2009/01/11/lego-fan-vs-lego-designer-the-mark-stafford-interview-part-3/

I know it isn't completely related to your question, but I thought I'd post it in case you were interested in it.
>>40
Interesting that the preliminary torso design for the old man CMF was eventually used for the Grandpa minifig that's been in a lot of 2018 City sets.
>>51
I didn't pick up on that, nice catch! Lego rarely releases concept art because they typically re-use everything. For example, the idea of futuristic knights (which would eventually become Nexo Knights) was pitched as far back as 2003.
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>>25 I do a little modding but it's mostly just removing certain print elements to customize pieces. Pic related; I removed the magenta stripes from the CMF Flashback Lucy hair, and removed the CARGO logo from the shirt with the green necktie. Pic 2: I removed the domino mask from the CMF Nurse Harley Quinn head Pic 3: I removed some elements from a common City torso to make a plain pink torso with female curve pattern Pic 4: I removed the horizontal makeup lines from the BAM clown head Pic 5: I removed the thick mustache from a 90s City head
>>587 Forgot to mention, the white visor in the first pic is the CMF Calculator Man visor
>What are the tools used by LEGO modders to make their own brick sets and Lego people? I think this may answer you first question; https://issuu.com/twomorrows/docs/minfigurecustomizationpreview https://issuu.com/twomorrows/docs/minifigurecustomization2preview I know it's just a preview, but it gives some ideas. Anyway, I don't like that kind of hardcore customization that needs to break and paint parts; IMHO the idea of Lego is to build things with the bricks that you have.
>Are there behind the scenes into LEGO creation? As in, videos of the creative process behind designing a set/legokin, marketing/focus groups and actual production thereof? Hopefully these help, all from Mark Stafford's Flickr. Lego is ridiculously secretive so trying to find good info is hard. >>589 >Anyway, I don't like that kind of hardcore customization that needs to break and paint parts; IMHO the idea of Lego is to build things with the bricks that you have. 100% agree, the fun in building comes from the challenge of trying to use a restrictive amount of parts and colours
>>587 How did you remove the prints?
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>>597 >How did you remove the prints? With these two things. I use tape to cover up the sections of the piece that I want to preserve, and use an eraser to rub the exposed area until the printing is gone. First, I pull off a piece of tape (I prefer this specific brand and type) that's long enough to wrap around the piece being altered, and touch the sticky side with my finger several times so it's not as sticky. The reason for touching the sticky side with a finger is because if the tape is too adhesive, you'll end up pulling off printing when you remove the tape. On the other hand, you want the tape to be adhesive enough to stay in place so you don't end up pushing the edge of it away while you're using the eraser. Once the tape is ready, cover up the part(s) you want to save. Some pieces, like Harley's head, require multiple pieces of tape layered over each other and require you to remove and reposition the tape during the process (don't try to recycle old tape; always use a fresh piece when re-applying). Brush the eraser (I recommend the Pentel ZE22 because it's easy to hold) in the direction of tape->no tape. If you brush the eraser toward the tape (instead of skimming across the tape and onto the exposed area), you'll push the edge of the tape away and expose parts of the printing you want to save. Running the piece under hot water while you pull the tape off seems to help avoid pulling off printing, probably because it loosens up the adhesive. Best thing is to start with simple pieces that don't have a lot of printing you want to save, so you can get an idea how much force is needed to rub off the printing. Once you get used to that, you'll have an easier time moving on to more complicated removals. Here's another example; the left torso is a Simpsons Edna Krabapple that I removed the center printing from.
This may be of interest OP. You can make your own prints using a laser printer and release paper. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5RSz3XzIB0&pbjreload=101
>>587 Tell me about that ork! Why does he wear the mask!
>>944 >Tell me about that ork! Why does he wear the mask! To look tough while he's working

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