/l/ - Virtual Livers/Virtual Youtubers

Fun things are fun. Take care of your Oshi.

SAVE THIS FILE: Anon.cafe Fallback File v1.0 (updated 2021-01-10)

fat/lain/: Serial Experiments Lain stream party starts Wed, Sep 22 at 3:59am UTC

Want your event posted here? Requests accepted in this /meta/ thread.

Max message length: 5120

Drag files to upload or
click here to select them

Maximum 5 files / Maximum size: 12.00 MB

Board Rules
More

(used to delete files and postings)


OC Raffle. See the Free Chat thread.


Open file (92.91 KB 1280x720 _IHxRCb2l_g.jpg)
Indies 09/11/2021 (Sat) 15:02:28 No.9
Use this thread to post about and recommend your favourite indie VTubers. As an example, here's Hina, a Virtual Youtuber focused on farming and cultivation of tomatoes. She also composes her own music, does stuff for Comiket, and even subtitles her own videos in English. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8-XixGs6a_0Q494Ebt1Vyg https://twitter.com/HinaSengariFarm
Hina's great. I really like that she wants people to farm, so she releases those booklets detailing how to start a farm in Japan. Her videos have encouraged a few anons to start working towards getting a Specified Skilled Workers Visa.
Loli soccer commentator. Very cute when she says GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOORU. She plays a few games every once in a while but doesn't get as much viewers. https://youtu.be/4xVrrPc_4c0
Open file (141.36 KB 1200x794 Efy4iY3UYAUHH4B.jpg)
>>15 Forgot pic.
Virtual Obaachan (バーチャルおばあちゃん) is pretty fun. I like when they play racing games and sports games. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uthm7ZIggNo
Open file (235.56 KB 701x1024 EsVPtGYU4AEzAHG.jpg)
>>12 >pdf >Foreigners who have completed Technical Intern Training (ii) Huh. I know it's off-topic, but isn't the Technical Intern Training program the one where women keep miscarrying from overwork and then abandon their babies' bodies because they fear being sent back to their countries and hit with penalties? https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20201229/p2a/00m/0na/015000c >There have been numerous incidents in which women who are in Japan as participants in the government's Technical Intern Training Program have abandoned their babies after giving birth. >Abandonment of babies by foreign trainees has been occurring across the country. In January 2019, a Chinese woman in her 20s who gave birth to a baby boy at her home in Kawasaki, Kanagawa Prefecture, south of Tokyo, abandoned the baby out of fear of being found out by her supervisors at work and forced to go back to China. She was arrested for negligence as a guardian. In April 2020, after a male fetus with a gestational age of 4 or 5 months was found in a septic tank of a housing development in the western Japan city of Tsuyama, Okayama Prefecture, a Vietnamese woman in her 20s was arrested. She told prefectural police, "I aborted the fetus because getting pregnant as a trainee means being sent back to your home country." https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/backstories/1498/ >A 26-year-old woman was arrested and indicted in the Hiroshima case. Prosecutors say she gave birth to a baby at her company dormitory, but the newborn died soon afterward. They say she buried the body in the dormitory yard. The corpse was discovered with no external wounds and the umbilical cord and placenta still attached. >The Japanese government bans businesses from unfavorably treating foreign technical trainees on account of pregnancy and childbirth. It also guarantees these workers the same rights to maternity and childcare leave as their Japanese counterparts. >But in practice, the situation is quite different. ... Pregnancy and childbirth means time away from work, something the consultant claims is a dealbreaker for Japanese employers. And when a trainee does become pregnant, that in turn undermines confidence in Vietnamese recruitment organizations. As a result, recruitment firms have banned participants from becoming pregnant – with some going even further by demanding trainees pay a $5,000 penalty if their programs are suspended for any reason, including pregnancy. That penalty is imposed on top of commissions and other agency fees that many trainees pay for their move to Japan. The consultant says the total can come to $10,000 dollars, a vast sum for most. Perhaps conditions improve once you manage to claw your way up to Specified Skilled Worker.
>>54 >but isn't the Technical Intern Training program the one where women keep miscarrying from overwork and then abandon their babies' bodies because they fear being sent back to their countries and hit with penalties? Wouldn't surprise me. It's a program for SEAfolk to do their skilled trade internships in Japan. Interns cost money when paid wages because they fuck up. I've worked domestically in jobs that had similar working conditions. When you cost your employer money to have hired on but your job is required to get the overall job done, you are expected to work very hard, very fast, very efficiently, and all for very long periods of time to squeeze every last dime of your paycheck out of you. Since this program would he the equivalency of a promotion from intern to apprentice or from apprentice to journeyman in rare cases, these sorts of workers turn a profit for the company and thus get treated better. If you're worried about off-topic, BO designated the meta thread as also being the off-topic thread.
>>54 >isn't the Technical Intern Training program the one where women keep miscarrying from overwork and then abandon their babies' bodies because they fear being sent back to their countries and hit with penalties? Yep. Like many apprenticeship-style programs, the TIT program is widely used to provide a relatively cheap and disposable semi-educated labor supply - except in this case it's branded as "skill sharing" to forestall criticism of using Asian wetbacks to fill out the low end of the labor market. The SEAniggers who're funneled into it usually receive little in the way of the OTJ training that the program is supposedly intended to provide (one does wonder how much apprenticeship is required for such skilled trades as "interior building cleaning"). Said SEAniggers naturally put up with it because they make more money as disposable workers in Japan than they would as disposable workers in SEAistan, same as any 3rd -> 1st world unskilled migrant worker. After a few years of being strung along, most get arbitrarily dismissed before their "internship" is complete and kicked back out (which is what most expect anyway). That NHK story you linked has links to other examples of how this works, like https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/backstories/1476/ which details how placement companies falsify trouble and forge paperwork to kick trainees back out, or https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/backstories/1587/ which details the typical bait-and-switch where a "trainee" is immediately assigned manual work other than what they're supposedly being apprenticed to do, and is disposed of if they make a fuss about it. TIT-program-imported vtuber forced to do nonstop marathon streams when?
>>15 Now that's an interesting niche. Never expected to see a chuuba doing soccer commentary. I agree with anon, that "Goaaal" was cute. >>41 I've seen some tweets and thumbnails of her, but the model gives me some uncanny valley that makes me not click on her videos. Props to her for motivating Subaru to become a VTuber though.
>>58 >>54 Funnily enough, the SSWV was created because of Nips using them as disposable labor leading to labor shortages under the TIT which is why orientation for TIT is good enough for this. This wasn't meant to be its own program but rather an expansion for those who worked under the TIT to come back. When TIT alumni told the Japanese government to fuck off, they started investigating into the shit companies were doing. Under the SSWV companies get fined if they demand guarantees or refuse to help you find housing. The catch is that you have to already have some of the technical knowhow of the job in question to get in. As an example, people think of hotel staffers for instance as simple cleaners and the like, but in reality that's supposed to be training by understanding how the hotel works inside and out so that as a higher ranking staffer you can direct guests, handle advanced situations, and ensure that resources are allocated efficiently. In an ideal world the worker would do the TIT, go back and work as a mid-level staffer in his/her home country for a few years, then come back for the SSWV. In reality it's just Zainichi, SEAs slipping through the cracks by being just barely profitable or necessary, and Weebs who already have the skillsets in their home countries who want jobs in Japan. Agriculture is the exception. Nips might have historically had little farmland, but now it's an issue of having farmland and the means to make profit, but being unable to get people to live as farmers in the countryside due to inconvenience. If you can stay in the SSWV for at least three years under the ministry of agriculture's branch, they will approve a student visa for you to study agriculture with the intent of opening a farm in Japan in one of said abandoned areas. It's hard work in agriculture, but anyone who doesn't have back injuries can do it and you get used to it after three or four months.

Report/Delete/Moderation Forms
Delete
Report

no cookies?