/k/ - Weapons, Combat, Outdoorsmanship

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/out/doorsmanship Strelok 12/05/2020 (Sat) 03:47:46 No.10262
A thread dedicated to camping, hiking, traveling, outdoor sports, and general outdoorsmanship. The fresh open air, clear blue skies, ice-cold white winters, and grey-black storms that threaten fire and flash floods are your domain Strelok. What will you make of it? Have you done any camping in the last year? Are you making sure to get that D get sunlight for your eyes and general health? Even in a concrete jungle there's usually great secrets to be found with a little time, exploration, and innovation.
I haven't camped in a very long time actually, and even then it was just some shitty campground with lots and not actual wilderness camping. What in general should I look for if I'm on the east coast and want to get into the primitive type stuff? One day assuming shit doesn't fall apart entirely soon I would like to tackle the Appalachian trail. The whole fucking thing, from wherever it starts in the south all the way to the northern end. Also I know as a general rule of thumb that if I'm gonna be carrying then I need to do it discreetly in some cases, but when it comes to hikes like that which go through multiple states are there feds patrolling the trails to make sure you're conforming to local gun laws, or is it basically not monitored save for the occasional forest ranger who doesn't really give a shit?
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>>10282 If you don't mind using Javascript, I've never had bad luck using this website so long as I wasn't camping during tourist season: https://freecampsites.net/ The nice thing is you can click a location and it will pull up reviews, pictures, etc. This one is also not bad: http://www.uscampgrounds.info/ I don't live on the East Coast so I can't really help you there. >but when it comes to hikes like that which go through multiple states are there feds patrolling the trails to make sure you're conforming to local gun laws, or is it basically not monitored save for the occasional forest ranger who doesn't really give a shit? If you openly open carry on a trail or something it depends since some forest rangers are chill and others are dicks. If you're leaving your funs around your campsite or are either concealed carrying or discretely carrying on trails, they will generally not give a shit. The closer you are to fancy nature areas like Florida, the more of a dick the park rangers will be, but honestly I've never seen park rangers out and about outside of tourist areas where they're writing parking tickets or handling a call about a feral animal in the vicinity. Drinking in public is illegal here even when camping, but I take a six pack and a book with me basically everywhere I go camping and I've never had problems with the park rangers even when they drive past me and I wave to 'em, but then that could just be where I'm at out West.
>>10287 Thanks for the links buddy. >that could just be where I'm at out West How far out west? I've always been under the impression that California/Oregon/Washington rangers were huge faggots like pretty much everyone else out that way, but over the past couple of years I've come under increasing doubt about this assumption especially since I almost got convicted of trespassing in Virginia because I took a step off a trail in a state park to take a piss and some fatso in a uniform happened to spot me.
>>10262 >Even in a concrete jungle there's usually great secrets to be found with a little time, exploration, and innovation. Although its goes against the thread wondering if anybody has done any urban exploration recently? I live on a farm in the middle of nowhere, so I've always been really interested in urban exploration. Too answer the OP's question, no I have not gone camping yet, but I go rucking [not timed, just for fun] in the woods on my property every single day.
>>10308 >rucking every day I hope you do stretches, take care of your joints strelok. From the little urbex I've done I can say you should at least make triple sure nobody who owns the property has eyes out for any prowlers. Also homeless people are not friendly, they might act like it but every one of them would shove an ice pick in your eye. At least that's how they are in the city near where I live. You'd be wise to keep an eye out and make sure nobody is squatting in whatever property you're exploring.
>>10312 >I hope you do stretches Every night before I go to bed. >You'd be wise to keep an eye out and make sure nobody is squatting in whatever property you're exploring. There is a abandoned as far as I can tell, well be doing more recon building on the property next to mine. That I'll be exploring, if I get caught worse things worst, I'll just play dumb and act like I thought is was public land.
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>>10290 >How far out west? I've camped from Utah through Kansas East-West and from Wyoming to Texas moving North-South along with a brief stint camping in Northern California. Nebraska and Utah are particularly comfy camping states. >I've always been under the impression that California/Oregon/Washington rangers were huge faggots like pretty much everyone else out that wa The closer they are to the cities, the bigger faggots the rangers are on average because Park Rangers near metropolitan areas are less Park Rangers and more glorified police officers receiving the same crooked pay and benefits package as police officers. The farther away from cities they are, the less they get compensated to be park rangers and thus the higher the chance is they work their job because they actually care about the environment and ecosystem. With the states west of Kentucky, driving between major population hubs is a 4-10 hour venture so there's more open land with fewer park rangers monitoring it/getting paid to monitor it. SoCal for instance is a shit hole to camp in, but Northern California is mostly open land and thus acts closer to the states East of the coast.
>>10262 >Even in a concrete jungle there's usually great secrets to be found with a little time, exploration, and innovation. How do explore? I am autism disability so I get free bus passes and train passes I think are half off in my county, the issue is sometimes the stops are a long walk. if I take the bike I might have to wait for another bus if the bike spot is full. I am never goanna be free, this is a prison I am 29 and still living with my parents I would have to explain where I went too also. I want to be free.
>>10354 >How do explore? Start with google maps, then once you found a spot that might be good, check it out in real life. I have no idea on how to make it free or how to overcome the autism challenges. and honestly, I don't know if it would be safe
>>10376 Safety is never guaranteed in an urbex scenario. Even if no one else is around to rat you out to pigs then there's always the possibility that you severely hurt yourself and don't have anyone around to call for help.
>>10394 >there's always the possibility that you severely hurt yourself Obviously, but I was talking about for a man who's autistic so autistic that he is living with his parents when he is 29 to go urban exploring. >don't have anyone around to call for help. I mean he could always call somebody with his phone.
>>10404 >phone I've been in abandoned buildings and had my service completely disappear before, particularly in basement areas, so even that's not a guarantee but it is better than nothing. Also if you decide to learn to pick locks definitely don't get caught in any areas they're supposed to be securing because that's a guaranteed breaking and entering charge.
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Do you need a permit to go camping in America? Also I wouldn't even know where to go camping besides just walking in the woods for a while and just sitting down in a clearing.
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>>10432 >Do you need a permit to go camping in America? Short answer: "It depends." Long answer: If you want to go actual backwoods camping (no vehicle access, possibly no trail or waterway access) in state parks or private properties, generally you need the local camping permit as well as a separate parking permit and campfire permit depending on the state. In some cases this permit is as simple as filling out a form when you show up to the campsite and slipping said form/cash into a box at the entrance to the campgrounds that a park ranger will check around closing time to make sure no one is violating local laws, and in some cases you need to actually talk to someone online/over the phone/at the property site to acquire it since different areas have different rules regarding camping. If you are camping in national forests, national grasslands, or land owned by the BLM that is not previously dedicated to pseudo-private ownership (cattle grazing most of the time), you do not need a permit unless otherwise stated on local signs. As a general rule of thumb, the further south or east you go, the more likely you will need a permit to go camping, since the less nature there is that is owned as national (federal) land. I suggest referring to >>10287 or if you are prone to refusing to use Javascript, doing it the old fashioned way and picking up maps of national forest boundaries. Generally national forests do not require permits and you are free to go off-trail and set up a tent wherever you want unless otherwise stated on local signage. Finding parking may or may not be more tricky though depending on local law (that will be posted on signage), and trails are less maintained (or nonexistent) in said national forests.
>>10437 are you from the old 8cuck days? I could've sworn I've seen that photo on the old board before it went down
>>10438 I am, but I only ever browsed /k/ for the /out/, /his/, and practical knowledge threads, not really for the weapons/warfare aspects.
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>>10441 welcome back, strelok
>>10262 I had the idea on backburner for making homemade MREs from commonly available store-bought goods. I know this is unoriginal but I wanted to do something different to the 1 pound of rice, 4 cans of spam and a jar of peanut butter. Talked it out with a friend and he thought I should come some requirements. This is what I came up with (ordered by descending order): >Feed five 5 men for a weekend (<3) day with >2000 Kcal a day >Common store-bought supplies >Minimum of one year of shelf life, maybe two years if possible >Must have little none preparatory work for meals >Reasonably cheap >Reasonably light >Preferably little to no synthetic/shitty ingredients What food that you anons bring when you camp? Anything novel, tastily or otherwise convenient? Didn't think camping food warranted its own thread so I'm posting here.
>>10535 If you can recognize them, Persimmons are useful if you need to tan or preserve stuff. Just don't eat the fruit before its nonastringent unless you want bezoars (furrballs for humans in your gut).
>>10535 >spoiler Actually I think i recall there being an MRE thread back on 8/k/. I mostly lurked as I didn't really have anything constructive to say. Truthfully, there is a lot here to talk about in terms of /k/ food. MREs, making your own MREs as you've said, best way to prepare game in the field or at home, how to skin game, what's what best mess kit... etc. I could go but I think you get the point. Anyways, I actually think on that we should keep the topic of /k/ food in this thread unless other wise needed. On the topic of camping, I am a little bit disappointed to say that it's been around 2 years since I've really done any kind of camping. I did a lot when i was younger and that was probably some of the best memories I made with my family since then. When camping, it was mostly with a trailer. I haven't done tent camping in probably more than 10 years. The food I brought with me reflects this because I had a small fridge. I would basically bring mostly everything I would have at home. So, eggs, bacon, bread. I would bring things like trail mix with me as well when I went hiking into the woods. Here are some pictures that should help contribute to the conversation.
>>10535 >Feed five 5 men for a weekend (<3) day with 2000 Kcal a day I'm confused, the 1 mre is supposed to feed 5 men for 3 days.
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>>10535 There was definitely a thread on 8/k/ about this. It's not hard, just mostly a matter of finding the right sort of things that are available to you, that are shelf stable. It's going to end up being a lot heavier than mountain house or real MREs, that's the trade off. Look for things like canned meats, ham flakes and tuna are great. Crackers can be found in individual packs, look for something like skyflakes or pilot biscuits. You can find instant rice type sides, like uncle ben's that are single serving, instant oatmeal for breakfasts and so on. Just keep thinking along those lines to find enough stuff to pad out a day worth. Then just top it off with the extras of sugar, jam, instant coffee packs, teabags, etc. Add a little pack of cigarettes and a book of matches if you really want that WWI vibe to go with all the canned foods. >>10443 Not the same guy, but it's good to be home.
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>>10857 >Add a little pack of cigarettes and a book of matches if you really want that WWI vibe to go with all the canned foods. I add little 5 ct bundles of smokes to my homebrew MREs. Generic freezer bags and bulk mylar helps for making your own single serving packs of whatever. I make them up during the winter when the humidity is super low. It's pretty tedious work so it's worth the time to prepare some tools and your methods beforehand. I modified a guillotine paper cutter with the heated sealing element from a broken foodsaver on the opposite side of the platform. A hinged piece of scrap wood with high temp silicone for the sealing edge swings down to meet the heating element that is affixed to the edge of the platform. It looks like some frankenstein shit, but I only have $15 into it) >pic related, just imagine the free side populated with the sealing parts and a gutted foodsaver dangling off the back
>>10873 Nice, I'm thinking of making some this winter as well when I have a bunch of free time. Got an recipes you care to share, or do you just make it up as you go along? No real point in posting about it now, but I'd like to see the old innawoods challenges come back next summer, like the old $20 overnight challenge. If this board lasts that long
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What kind of MRE does /k/ take with them when they go innawoods? I was looking to buy some for myself as I wanted to take them hunting and camping. Also I have some friends I wanted to take with me as well and they have lost most of their teeth so I would like the food to be fairly soft, if possible.
>>11620 This is a kind reminder that you probably shouldn't be using google. This isn't /tech/ so I won't judge you for it (and at worse, its indirectly advertising for google, but I do not view it as deliberately shilling outside ib links.. much like archive it serves a purpose), but it's generally a bad taste compared to uploading these files locally on the pdf/webm thread and/or hosting on another site Mega is a FBI op and shouldn't be trusted. I'll try to get some sort of alternate upload/torrent added but currently since my internet is ran by the equivalent of the USPS and it is slow as fuck. >edited for forgetting to write advertising for, I need my morning coffee.
Edited last time by zergfacecultist on 01/04/2021 (Mon) 17:14:22.
>>11656 based infosec vol
>>10535 In a 3 day bag I planned, the food consisted of crackers, different kinds of trail mix, and some neat canned tuna salad I bought at krogers, but haven't seen sold in years. I thought about bringing pasta like orzo in my current bag. I'm thinking olive oil would be great to bring, to add to grains in cooking, since it's dense in calories. The only problem I see is storing it and making sure it doesn't spill all over my stuff in my bag. Got any container recommendations? Unrelated to cooking; also looking for flashlight or lantern recommendations.
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>>15552 Oil is tricky, i would use fat or lard instead. But if you really need read: want oil, you can try using those small, one-gulp glass bottles that booze comes in (pic related). They're often sold at gas stations, at least here in Europe, i don't know about america or russia, but i think you can find something similar, just make sure it's a screw-on cap and has a plastic insert in it. You can also pack it a plastic bag, just to be sure, but i never had any spillage with those (i keep a bit of oil for my gun in one of those, because i don't wanna haul an entire bottle of lube around.)
>>15552 >consisted of crackers Unless you regularly like eating crackers or plan to go innamountains, fats and proteins should almost always be given priority over carbs outside of morale sweets and filler agents like pasta. >The only problem I see is storing it and making sure it doesn't spill all over my stuff in my bag. Got any container recommendations? If your meals are individually separated, take advice from >>15563 those nips are perfect portion sizes for oil and the alcohol means the bottle is pre-sterilized. They work great for vinegar and seasoning oils too. If you don't mind lugging around a larger thing of oil for several meals, a vacuum-sealed stainless steel water bottle with a tapered top makes a perfectly fine oil storage container that can take being in direct sunlight for a couple hours. Infrequently. Still, solid fats are preferable. If you're planning rustic cooking, look into getting and rendering some suet from a local butcher (ask specifically for kidney fat) and render it into tallow for that extra nice touch.
>>10535 >What food that you anons bring when you camp? Depends what I am planing to do when going outside and how long I stay. I am comfortable enough with my local flora&fauna that I could go full survival and just live from what I find in nature, but hunting&gathering takes a lot of time and it woiuld fill up most of my day. Because of this if I want to explore and cover much ground, I just pack a bunch of dried meat/sausages, protein&muesli bars and water and consume that on the way. Equally if it's just one or two days, why stress myself out about food when I can simply take a can of stew or canned ravioli from the store with me? If you go hunting, take the ingredients with you to make most of the fresh meat that you will get. If it is a longer camping trip I simply would buy good quality food that I would also have a home that dosn't spoil if it isn't cooled, about enough for a week and the resuply at a farmers' market once I run out. >Minimum of one year of shelf life, maybe two years if possible >Must have little none preparatory work for meals >Preferably little to no synthetic/shitty ingredients Those things exclude each other when it comes to food and you only can find a balance. The more you preserve a food and make it self stable, the more you have things in it you don't actually want to have in your food. The freshest and purest ingredients require more preparatory work if you actually cook a meal with them and don't eat them raw. For example meat that has been salted to preserve it has too much salt in it to be healthy, you either have to remove the salt during cooking or drink a tone of water to make up for it.
>>10535 >camping not camping, but sometimes i hike. I mostly take a mix of bought plain nuts, and some home-dried fruit. Additionally, some slices of bread, and a piece of dried sausage for protein and salt. It's not super fancy, but it get's me through the day, and keeps me on my legs. >minimum one year shelf life do some preserving maybe? I got into it pretty recently, just last year i started drying fruits and vegetables, this year i wanna try drying meat, and now that i have a welder, i can try building a smoker and smoke some meats. Put some work into it, preserving food takes lots of work and dedication, but it's so worth it (dried pears are so damn delicious, i almost like 'em more than fresh ones).
Has /k/ ever encountered anything paranormal or spooky while innawoods?
>>16056 A few. Mainly fairies that saved me from a disaster like falling from a 20 foot ledge during a rainstorm, or the malevolent ones that killed my friend's dog after he disrespected the campsite. Nothing too crazy.
>>16056 Only in my house.
Is there any truth to the whole keeping a middle C tuning fork around when manually pollinating flowers since it's the same frequency bumblebees vibrate at to collect pollen?
>>16122 It's technically true but practically it mostly just applies to tomatos and a few others.
Whats a good way to get rid of ticks and chiggers before and after they get on you? I was thinking maybe figuring out what can be ingested on a daily basis that would make me unpaletteable or secreting an aroma that acts as a natural repellent.
>>16138 Boots, bloused pants, long sleeves and gloves to keep them off you. After that theres a bunch of walmart ointments that irritate ticks and seal chiggers to their fate. Not much else to do since you arent a dog.
>>16138 Ticks rely on a mixture of smelling the CO2 coming off your body and heat/light changes to detect humans. That being said, peppermint oil drives away most arachnids and bugs including ticks, and both lemongrass and citronella are effective as well. To be honest listen to >>16141 and maybe dab some citronella or lemongrass essential oil on your appendages. There's plenty of colognes that double as insect repellant due to the presence of citronella. It also keeps away mosquitos.
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>>16141 >Boots, bloused pants, long sleeves and gloves to keep them off you. Add a hat with a brim and a head net then even the mosquitoes and black flies can't get you. If you don't mind using chemicals, DEET will keep them off of your skin and permethrin will treat clothing for a few months or a few washings, whichever comes first. I found a good knife for generic camping and bush-craft purposes. I bought a Morakniv Kansbol because I wanted to see if Moras live up to the hype, it put me over the free shipping threshold, and it looked cool. After playing with it a bit It really does seem versatile, the compound grind works for carving and slicing. The bleeding finger pictogram on the box is right too. I cut myself seeing if it would shave the hair on the back of my hand. It's the sharpest knife out of the box that I've seen so far. I know I sound like a shill but I am genuinely pleased with what is essentially an impulse buy. It just seems to fit the archetype of KNIFE in the primitive part of my mind.
>>17442 I got a cheapo mora I found somewhere. Its probably one of the better knifes I got where I can use and trash it through work.
>>17442 >People using actually bought knives from high grade steel, caring for it, using it for work. >Me, found an shitty dull kitchen knife with reasonably thick blade, sharpened to a workable blade, uses it for carving wood and cutting my steak. Am I wrong? Or am I just a poorfag?
>>17452 If it works it works man.
>>17452 Knife is merely a sharpened piece of metal. If it works then it's good enough.
>>17452 Depends on the application. I hate niggers who use other people's knife tips as a flathead screwdriver. My favorite everyday carry knife is an incredibly cheap piece of fucking garbage $1.50 Walmart pocket knife. I use it maybe 1-5 times a day at work to cut through shit when dull scissors won't cut it or when I forget a butter knife for spreading something, sharpen it every 10 uses or so for a few minutes, and it works great. Probably wouldn't survive stabbing someone more than twice, but who gives a shit?

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