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29:64 "And this worldly life is not but diversion and amusement. And indeed, the home of the Hereafter - that is the [eternal] life, if only they knew."


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Vinegar & Other Considerations In Modern Times Anonymous 02/27/2021 (Sat) 23:41:37 ID: 874a6b No.194
Muhammad was pretty fond of vinegar despite it being the result of the breakdown of alcohol. He even came up with an entire halal vinegar-making distillation process (Takhammur/Takhallul processes) that was meant to prevent the vinegar-makers from having access to the alcoholic juice during the alcohol distillation. Such processes seemed more to be for the benefit and consideration of the workers so that they would not run afoul of the laws of the land during the time period (by producing alcohol) rather than out of religious necessity since vinegar was traditionally produced in what would be considered small/"home brew" batches. In the age of industrial processes that effectively separate the worker from his ability to sin by producing the vinegar products of wines/grains in processes where it would be extremely difficult to produce and the vinegar producers themselves are generally of the company sort that are reputable/not known for imbibing in the alcohols used to produce their vinegars, should such considerations for the halal vinegar-making process still be taken into account to protect the individual from sin outside of homebrew application using halal measures? Are there any other food production or sin-related measures that /islam/ would take into consideration with modern times separating the purely religious reasonings that should be absolutely followed from the practical application reasonings that were implemented for the protection of the individual? Disclaimer: I'm a Christian of the old faith branches so I understand religious significance in modern times and this is all just philosophical.
>>194 From what I understand, alcohol is haram because it is an 'impure substance'. It is addictive and has deleterious effects upon the mind and body. Vinegar does not produce the same effect, in fact it would have been very important for purifying drinking water before the advent of modern filtration techniques.
>>195 Well yes, my point was more you have to create alcohol to create vinegar, and there's a very specific distillation method that the Islamic community uses in order to produce vinegar that's supposed to prevent the formation of alcohols/prevent accessibility to those formations. That's why there's Muslim-friendly vinegars while your average wine-based vinegar is not approved due to the process used to make it. My question was more based on the philosophy behind the production of vinegar and how in modern times, even wine-based vinegars tend to come from sources that would not have general drinking access to it in the wine form, rather than the small batches as it was produced in the past from fruit juices.
>>195 I always heard there was a Hadith that said "What is haram in big amounts is haram in little. "
>>194 >Are there any other food production or sin-related measures that /islam/ would take into consideration with modern times separating the purely religious reasonings that should be absolutely followed from the practical application reasonings that were implemented for the protection of the individual? Well, I can tell you what wasn't taken into consideration : factory farm animal meat. Halal, when it comes to procuring animal meat, is about minimizing the suffering of the animal. The precautions taken when slaughtering an animal (ie : making sure the blade is sharp, keeping the slaughter scene away from other animals, etc) are all for this reason. But now, we have factory farms, and I don't need to tell you how they trea the animals there. The point is : would slaughtering the animal according to Islamic teachings still make its meat halal, when the animal had suffered all throughout its life under the farm's supervision?
>>270 I would say no, personally.

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