/comfy/ - A place to relax

Want your event posted here? Requests accepted in this /meta/ thread.

Max message length: 5120

Drag files to upload or
click here to select them

Maximum 5 files / Maximum size: 20.00 MB

More

(used to delete files and postings)


Open file (2.05 MB 4032x3024 BRED.jpg)
Open file (1.05 MB 4032x3024 carrot attempt.jpg)
Open file (1.21 MB 4032x3024 carrot result.jpg)
Open file (2.62 MB 4032x3024 pork.jpg)
Comfy Baking, Brewing, and Cooking Anon 04/26/2020 (Sun) 11:36:45 No.380
Baking, brewing, and cooking are very important hearth-building and health-building skills. They are a surefire way to make yourself /comfy/, Anon! What are you baking, brewing, or cooking at the moment? How is it coming out? What will you be trying next time? Is there anything you'd like to try improving? Is there something you'd like to learn? Maybe you have something you'd like to teach us? I tried some old things and new things today! Pics related are: >the bread I made earlier today; a simple white cobb loaf. This was the first time I was just able to make it from memory. It felt great to be able to just reach for the ingredients and go through the motions. As luck would have it, the prove went well and the slashes formed up beautifully. I was worried that the crumb inside would be a little wet but it turned out very nice with a good chewy crust. The loaf is wrapped in beeswax cloth now so I can eat it over the week. I'm considering getting a sourdough starter going but I don't know if I'm good enough to handle it yet. >my first attempt at glazing carrots Apparently glazing (which I have found out is different from caramelising) is a basic technique that even professionals find difficult to get perfect every time. I think my first attempt here had just a touch too little water and a touch too little sugar, though I reckon I got the butter correct. See how the finished carrots don't have an even glaze? They still tasted very good with some parsley and finishing salt. Next I'm going to try blanching with asparagus. >sous vide pork tenderloin >fell for the sous vide meme Yes, and I love it! Weirdly, the garlic I put on these pork tenderloins was stained bluish-green by the other herbs during the water bath, but they cooked down to a tasty colour during the two minute finishing sear. I had the pork together with the carrots for dinner. They tasted great and I felt a great upswell of wellbeing after I finished them. Your turn, Anon!
These are amazing OP, holy shit. Would definitely eat. Do you have any tips/words of wisdom for beginners? Something you've picked up from your experiences?
>>414 >Do you have any tips/words of wisdom for beginners? I am a novice, but I suppose I'll share some of my undercooked advice anyway. The most important thing is to actually cook. Get into the kitchen and make something. A home-cooked meal can nourish you in ways restaurant food or takeout simply cannot. Don't treat cooking as a bad chore. It is a chore, but it's a chore that lets you have fun chopping and smelling and touching all kinds of nice things. Once you realise this, you pay more attention and get better at things because you enjoy it. Remember that your food need not be perfect to taste really good. But do pay attention: Does it taste good? If you do it a little different the next time, does it taste better? Get a good knife if you can afford to. Expensive does not automatically mean good, but if you buy cheap you'll buy twice. But even a cheap knife will do the job, so don't get hung upon equipment. You only really need a good french knife and a good utility knife. Treat your knives with respect. Hone them before use but do not try to use a honer as a sharpener. Learn to measure and weigh as second nature. You must learn to follow recipes consistently. Do learn the basics of using salt and acid. Seasoning is so important. Herbs too! When learning to bake, be prepared to suck at it at first. You need to get the bad loaves out of the way before you can make good ones. Does that help?
>>436 Oh, and TASTE as you cook! You must taste what you are cooking, as you are cooking it! Bite into pasta to see if it's properly al dente. Take little sips of sauces as they form up. Dip your finger into dressings as you make them. Every one of your senses must be involved as you cook.
>>436 >>437 Yeah that really helps, thanks anon. I don't think I'll be able to get ingredients any time soon but I'll post my experiments when I get to it.
Last thing I baked were snickerdoodle cookies last week. Can't enjoy them now because I am on a cut, but man they have to be my favorite cookie. They just have this chewy, light, and not too sweet thing about them. Add a glass of milk and it's just the best.
Open file (307.39 KB 838x1080 eivXUnUV-ws.jpg)
>>380 That's an impressive bread you got there. How do you get it to rise so much? My bread always ends up flat :C
>>380 When baking bread, preheat oven to 250C with a heavy cast-iron pot with a lid in it. When preheated, take out pot, put dough in pot, cover pot with lied and put in oven for 45 minutes at 230C. Makes crust like from the bakery. >>802 Not OP, but long proofing periods (24 hours in total) and after 8 and 16 hours, stretch the dough thoroughly by picking up an edge, pulling it as high as it goes without ripping and pressing down again in the middle, then repeating the step along the whole dough. Form after 24 hours, proof another hour in a form, then bake. I've mostly been living off peas' pudding lately. Water a pound of legumes, get a large pot of water/very very light stock boiling, tie legumes slack into a finely woven cloth, cook for 90 minutes, turn out and mash legumes, mix with a tablespoon of fat (if not solid, add more flour), 3 tbsp of flour, 1 tsp of salt, some pepper, tie up snugly in the same cloth from before and cook for another hour, turn out in loaf tin, let cool and put in fridge. Then cut off slices and fry them up in some fat. The recipe has a large amount of possible variety in legumes you can use and spices, and it has some of that bready quality that means you can eat it everyday without getting sick of it. Just add some carbs and vegetables and you've got an easy (if not quick) complete meal plan. I'm also into historical cooking. Roman cuisine is fascinating. It's a pity you can't get Ofellae delivered anymore.
>>806 I see. >long proofing periods (24 hours in total) and after 8 and 16 hours What is the ambient temperature of the proofing environment?
>>808 Normal room temperature, about 23 degrees.
>>802 You have to eat all the eggs. I knead in a way that rapidly develops gluten by trapping extra air in the bread but that just means I knead less rather than it rising more. I don’t do extended resting or proving - the loaf you see in OP had an hour of each - and I make sure my oven is nice and hot with a stone to store extra heat so that the yeast gets to have a final party before it dies off. If your bread comes out flat then you aren’t adding enough yeast, or over/under-kneading, or over/under proving, or you’re not shaping with a nice spine underneath to help make it rise up instead of out, or you aren’t slashing just before the oven so that the bread expands in the directions you want. Basically if your bread fails to get its oven boost then either there’s not enough gas in the bread and the gluten’s still too tight, or there’s too much gas and all the lovely little pockets have burst into each other during the prove which creates a big floppy balloon that won’t go anywhere. The latter happens when you prove too long or too aggressively.
Open file (1.36 MB 4032x3024 milk.jpeg)
Open file (2.56 MB 4032x3024 not as milk.jpeg)
Open file (1.66 MB 4032x3024 draining.jpeg)
Open file (1.46 MB 4032x3024 draining apparatus.jpeg)
Open file (1.34 MB 4032x3024 finished.jpeg)
I had a /comfy/ck/ day today. I just finished cooking my way through a chained cooking combo. Please endure this borderline blogposting. I had too much milk. I didn't want to throw it away. So I looked up things to do with extra milk. THING ONE Ricotta. It turns out that making ricotta cheese is fucking easy. I had no idea. Traditionally, ricotta is made with the spare rennet in the whey left over from making mozzarella but you can make it just as well with a bit of lemon juice. I had a liter of lightly pasteurized milk so I just had to heat it to a little before boiling, add a touch of lemon juice and salt, then drain the curds when they'd properly separated. The result was creamy and tasty.
Open file (1.91 MB 4032x3024 chicken in milk.jpeg)
Open file (1.52 MB 4032x3024 potato.jpeg)
Open file (1.07 MB 4032x3024 chicken out of milk.jpeg)
>>1048 THING TWO Chicken in milk. This recipe is supposed to be done with an entire chicken but I only had a couple of chicken breasts so I scaled it down a little. The milk sauce separated just a little as it cooked together with the chicken juices. Didn't taste milky at all - more like a slightly sweet and very herbal solid sauce. I roughly cut some potato and steamed some broccoli and had the whole thing for lunch. I suppose it'd have been even better if I'd roasted an entire chicken in it because then the chicken juices would have blended with the curd-sauce.
Open file (1.32 MB 4032x3024 whey.jpeg)
Open file (3.02 MB 4032x3024 wheybred.jpeg)
Open file (1.24 MB 4032x3024 wheybred slices.jpeg)
>>1049 THING THREE What to do with the whey left over from the ricotta? It turns out that whey can be used instead of water in bread! I made a simple cobb loaf with some of it. The crust came out chewier than I'd ever felt before, and the crumb had a new flavor I can't quite describe - it tasted deeper somehow.
Open file (2.35 MB 4032x3024 yoko.jpeg)
Open file (2.33 MB 4032x3024 yoko rear view.jpeg)
Open file (1.35 MB 4032x3024 soup.jpeg)
Open file (1.22 MB 3024x4032 old fashioned.jpeg)
>>1050 Yoko here holds down my cup noodles while they go through their three minute cook. When she isn't fulfilling her sole purpose she's eye candy for my range hood. THING FOUR Whey can also be added to soups to deepen the flavor! I added the rest of the whey to this here pork and cabbage soup. (I say pork and cabbage soup but it's really pork and cabbage and butter and onion and herb and garlic and cauliflower and paprika.) Had it with the whey bread and OH MY FUCKING GOD it did something. Some kind of bonus synergy between whey-enhanced foods, I don't know. The bread slice was dense and chewy even when soaked with soup and the flavor of they whey added extradimensional umami with a hint of sweetness. Finished off the evening with some rye whiskey cut with bitters and benedictine herbal liqueur - an Old Fashioned-style cocktail with the honey standing in for the traditional sugar cube. COOK SOMETHING ANONS, I want to see your food.
>>1051 THING FIVE I used the ricotta to make ricotta pancakes but was so busy eating them that I forgot to take a photo.
Open file (3.20 MB 3024x4032 roll 1.jpg)
Open file (2.57 MB 4032x3024 roll 2.jpg)
I'm new to dabbling with dough. What do you think of this thing I made? It's got pepperoni, eggplant, 3 kinds of cheese, and a homemade tomato sauce.
I made a jar of sauerkraut which has been fermenting for about a week, my problem is I have no idea how it should taste like, since I've never had it. I kinda like it so I guess it turned out ok. >>1056 Looks great, anon. Hope it tasted great too.
>>1056 That looks incredible anon. My mouth is watering. Did you use a yeasted dough or a pastry style? >>1059 Different saurkrauts taste different but my ideal is a little crunchy with a gentle vinegar flavor and slightly sweet. I like to heap it next to what I'm eating, almost as a condiment. In the end what matters is that you like what you're making, right?
>>1062 The only kind of dough I know how to make: water, yeast, salt and oil. The sauce was the best part, my dough still needs work. I need to get cook time and temperature right and I really need a baking stone.

Report/Delete/Moderation Forms
Delete
Report

Captcha (required for reports and bans by board staff)

no cookies?