/christian/ - Christianity

Discussion of Christianity, the Church, and theology

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John 3:16 KJV: For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.


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What became of the original Christian Jewish community? Anonymous 12/14/2022 (Wed) 01:49:14 ID: 0380d8 No.22299
Here's a question that has always puzzled me: So we all know that a good chunk of Jewish people rejected Christ and went on to become the modern religion of Talmudic Judaism. But there were also a sizable chunk of the Jewish community that submitted to Jesus and became the first Christians. However, if you asked me to point out where Talmudic Jews are, I would only have to point to modern Israel and the various diaspora Jewish communities throughout the world. But if you asked me to point out Jewish communities or individuals descended from the original Jewish Christians, who have kept up such customs.... I would be at a total loss. So what happened to them or where are they? Did the original Jewish Christians simply intermarry amongst the Gentiles to the point of being absorbed? Or are their communities of Jewish Christians who can trace their lineage back to the original Jewish Christians that exist, but either don't have as much prominent PR as Talmudic Jews, or are simply not as numerous? And I don't mean Messianic Jews either, since this group, from what I understand, consists almost entirely of either ex-Talmudic Jews, or Gentiles who have married into or adopted Jewish customs on top of a faith in Jesus.
>>22299 >So we all know that a good chunk of Jewish people rejected Christ and went on to become the modern religion of Talmudic Judaism I don't think I know that. My reading of history is that there were three Jewish revolts, and the Romans had enough of their rebellions, slaughtered them, and forbid the few survivors from ever returning to Jerusalem. Christians suffered under the pagan Romans because the Romans considered them just a denomination of Judaism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish%E2%80%93Roman_wars#Bar_Kokhba_Revolt Simon bar Kokhba, the commander of the revolt, was acclaimed as a Messiah, a heroic figure who could restore Israel. ... " Roman army made up of six full legions with auxilia and elements from up to six additional legions finally crushed it.[30] Judea's rural countryside was devastated and depopulated due to the brutal suppression of the revolt.[31][32][33][34][35] During this period, Jerusalem was rebuilt into a Roman colony called Aelia Capitolina, and the province of Judea was renamed Syria Palaestina. The Romans barred Jews from Jerusalem, except to attend Tisha B'Av. Although Jewish Christians hailed Jesus as the Messiah and did not support Bar Kokhba, they were barred from Jerusalem along with the rest of the Jews.[citation needed] The war and its aftermath helped differentiate Christianity as a religion distinct from Judaism.'' Messianic Jews who believed Christ to be the messiah became known as "Christians" Could be wrong. feel free to disagree. As I understand it, the Babylonian Talmud, a book of wickedness and lies, was brought back by the Jews after the Babylonian captivity. The shift from the Torah to the Talmud was pronounced e.g. the Jews lying about Christ to Pontius Pilate to murder him (a clear vioation of thou shalt not kill and thou shalt not bear false witness) yet making sure they didn't set foot in Pilate's pagan ground before Passover, least they be "unclean" is a clear example of their wickedness, and their belief in Kokhba and their right to rule over "cattle" i.e. everyone else in the world, was more a promise from Satan than anything God promised them in the Torah.
>>22300 I greatly appreciate the info and for corrections where I was mistaken. Nevertheless, you misunderstand me in some areas. For example: >Messianic Jews who believed Christ to be the >messiah became known as "Christians" >Could be wrong. feel free to disagree. When I say Messianic Jews, I'm not talking about the 1st century Jews who were the first Christians. I am referring to current day adherents to the modern religion of Messianic Judaism (who actively prefer to not be called "Christian."): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messianic_Judaism Also my main central question remains unanswered. Especially in current day Israel, but also all around the world, if someone refers to themself as "Jewish," 9.9 times out of 10, they do not believe in Jesus as the Messiah, and are somewhere on the spectrum of Talmudic Judaism. Whether it be full blown Ultraorthodox Jews, or Secularists who engage in Jewish holidays, rituals and traditions for the sake of cultural identity. However, if you were to ask me to point out an individual or community of Jews who believe in Christ and are Christians in the traditional sense of the term, who are directly descended from the original 1st century Jewish Christians, I would be at a total loss. Where are they? What happened to them? Are they in small obscure gatherings that I am ignorant of? Or did they essentially intermarry into the Gentile populations around them, and thus no longer exist as a distinct group?
>>22300 >As I understand it, the Babylonian Talmud, a book of wickedness and lies, was brought back by the Jews after the Babylonian captivity. You mean like during the time of Daniel? Because the Talmud (both versions) weren't made until after the destruction of the second temple. They were suppose to unite the divided Jewish people (each village had its own kind of interpretations and customs and they needed unity to survive the diaspora)
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>>22309 >Because the Talmud (both versions) weren't made until after the destruction of the second temple. This can't be stressed enough because its origins stem from Jews that moved BACK to Babylon(!) after the destruction of the Roman-Jewish Wars, not from the Babylonian exile. Everyone just assumes it comes from the exile due to the name (ans deliberate confusion over its history), but the reality is even more ridiculous in that this group chose to return to the centre of idolatry that God had delivered them from to produce the worst writings in the history of mankind: >The Babylonian Talmud (Talmud Bavli) consists of documents compiled over the period of late antiquity (3rd to 6th centuries).[14] During this time, the most important of the Jewish centres in Mesopotamia, a region called "Babylonia" in Jewish sources and later known as Iraq, were Nehardea, Nisibis (modern Nusaybin), Mahoza (al-Mada'in, just to the south of what is now Baghdad), Pumbedita (near present-day al Anbar Governorate), and the Sura Academy, probably located about 60 km (37 mi) south of Baghdad.[15]
>>22299 Allegedly there are Christian communities in Israel and Palestine. I guess these are most likely to be descendants of the originals but I also suspect this >Did the original Jewish Christians simply intermarry amongst the Gentiles to the point of being absorbed? to be true. Once they accepted Christ they lost the need for genealogical purity and the inbreeding it engenders.
>>22299 https://yewtu.be/watch?v=uzuYZi749CM This video in denominations I think may imply an answer. Jewish Christians were those who stoll kept the old covenant; but then they Listened too the Pauline Christian's and eventually only practiced the New Covenant.
using /christian/ to talk about jews made me realize that we don't have a /judaism/ or /jewish/ board even when we have the /islam/ one. We should have one or at least make public the israel chan
>>22299 what is Jewish culture but the sum total of the mosaic law? Take it away and all is left is language at best, Jews were always a minority especially after getting crushed by the Romans. Of course there are the Ethiopians were majority Jewish being known as 'beta-israel' and many of them who accepted Christianity kept their judaizing customs.

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