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2 Samuel 5:6 Anonymous 07/15/2021 (Thu) 22:22:39 No.1181
>6 And the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: which spake unto David, saying, Except thou take away the blind and the lame, thou shalt not come in hither: thinking, David cannot come in hither. 7 Nevertheless David took the strong hold of Zion: the same is the city of David. 8 And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind, that are hated of David's soul, he shall be chief and captain. Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not come into the house. 9 So David dwelt in the fort, and called it the city of David. And David built round about from Millo and inward. What did the Jebusites mean by the "blind and the lame"? The interpretation in modern translations doesn't seem to be scriptural ("even the blind and the lame can drive you off"). The other alternative understandings: they are referring to their idols (but why would they be insulting their false gods?), or they are saying David's soldiers are blind and lame in the face of their fortifications. Did they refer to weapons? The verse immediately after mentions David has to attack through an aqueduct. Why does David hate these lame and blind with his soul?
>>1181 The possible meanings of this have been exposited, but largely consolidate around one of two views. The first view says that the Jebusites were aware of the sayings of the children of Israel, which could already have been said at that time, which is that the false gods of the heathen are blind, lame and dumb. Therefore, the Jebusites, thinking that David would be unable to mount a successful attack against their well-defended position, took the opportunity to credit the defense of their city to the very idols which the Israelites had called blind and dumb, thus in effect trying to use the Israelites own saying against them. This view and the idea that one reason why David was allowed to win this battle was to defeat the boasts of the heathen as to their idols, it is in some ways reminiscent of what the sacred account later says in 1 Kings 20:28- >And there came a man of God, and spake unto the king of Israel, and said, Thus saith the LORD, Because the Syrians have said, The LORD is God of the hills, but he is not God of the valleys, therefore will I deliver all this great multitude into thine hand, and ye shall know that I am the LORD. The other view is as you described, which is simply that the Jebusites were mocking David's army by saying that the blind and lame within and without the city would be sufficient to guard it. This view however does not have the strength of explaining the extra bit of information we learn, that the reason we know why the heathens turned to their saying was because they already thought David could not win the battle. Obviously, if they thought victory was a foregone conclusion, and they felt no danger of defeat, then they would want to give credit in advance to their idols while at the same time attempting to dissipate the notion that they were lame and blind. However, this backfired greatly as we can imagine after they lost the battle.
>>1191 Yes, it also read like possibly the Jebusites were being sarcastic and mocking the Israelites' insults. However it doesn't feel very certain to read implied senses into scripture as it seems too open to subjective influence to be reliable
>>1181 >>1191 After reviewing the passage and the modern interpretation, which is actually sourced from the Greek Septuagint, it sounds like an expression that means "to the last man". In addition, "hated of" David's soul means they were "full of hate of," not that David hates of them; or put another way, the Hebrew here is a word that also means "enemies of", thus: >6 And the king and his men went to Jerusalem unto the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land: which spake unto David, saying, Except thou take away the blind and the lame (to the last man), thou shalt not come in hither: thinking, David cannot come in hither. >7 Nevertheless David took the strong hold of Zion: the same is the city of David. >8 And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind (to the last man), that are hated (enemies) of David's soul, he shall be chief and captain. Wherefore they said, (even) The blind and the lame (of the Jebusites) shall not come into the house. As a rebuff of their insolent pride before David.
>>1221 In addition to it semantically making sense, there are also these following points: 1. There is a Levitical law mentioning the lame and the blind, but it is referring to sacrificial animals, not people. 2. There are lame and blind present in and/or around Jerusalem and the temple that Jesus cures, so it wasn't a blanket condemnation; the afflicted naturally seek out a cure from the temple and the temple authorities are wont to oblige them as it secures their repute before society. 3. The blind and the lame mentioned elsewhere in the Bible to elicit pity, not emnity, as it does by natural impulse. 4. The Jebusites thereafter the conquest became peasants under the Israelites; this would be an explanation as to why the temple authorities would not extend the same mercy towards their disabled as they did others, due to their historic disdain towards David.
>>1221 >>1222 What I find strange is despite all the """scholarship""" expositing on it, none seemed to read out this intuitive understanding.

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